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My grandma has passed and left her house jointly to my mom and 2 aunts. My mom would like to keep the house, and my aunts have both said they are willing to let my mom buy them out of their share of the equity. My question is, once this is done, and the legal papers are signed, will they have ANY rights or say in what my mom does with the house from that point forward? (Relations among them are bitter and hateful, to say the least, so my mom would like to distance herself from them as soon as possible.)

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So many times wills and trusts don't work out the way we and out parents want them to. Better to buy it now. Congratulations on the impending birth of your baby. When our first one was born, we lived in a 1 BR apt. and she slept in the dining area. In those days, babies didn't need as much *stuff* as they seem to need these days. You'll work it out, I'm sure.
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Good point, txcamper. We do plan on doing some updates and plan to do it before moving all our stuff in. That's a good point that by doing that stuff, hopefully it'll give my aunts a "buffer time" to accept that stuff IS being done to the house and someone else IS moving in. I just hope all of this happens, and my mom does get the house. Like I mentioned above, my husband and I are expecting our first baby in October and would ideally like to be moved in and settled before that! BUT, it'll work out as it's meant to work out. I'm trying not to worry about that.

Also, good point about legally buying the house from my mom. At the very least I told her I want her to put in her will or trust or something, that the house will go to me upon her passing. Just in case, as you said, something happens unexpectedly and it's in her sole name. Lots of factors at play here.
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May I suggest that you wait a short period of time before moving in. Just to let the dust settle, so to speak. Y'all could paint and clean and that would be easier done in an empty house anyway. That would give the aunts time to get used to the idea that someone else is going to live in the house.

If your mother intends to sell you the house, it might be better that it's done sooner rather than later. No one knows what might be in our future and if her health declines and she needs services, she might need the money for her care.
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Definitely, Geewiz! Changing the locks will be done IMMEDIATELY upon my mom getting possession!
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I agre with the others, once the sale of the house is complete and your Mom is the sole owner, it is hers to do with as she pleases. One suggestion - change all of the locks. If the family is as difficult as you portray, better safe than sorry.
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Thanks to both of you who answered so far! Txcamper, to answer your question... our ultimate goal is to have me move into the house and eventually buy it from my mom. The reason I'm not just buying it straight from my mom and 2 aunts is because they can get nasty (they've given my mom TONS of problems in the past few years), jealous, and vindictive. Since my mom is a legal heir, we figured it was "safest" to just let her buy them out and get it in her name alone. And then I will move in (with my husband). Our fear is if my aunts get wind of this ahead of time, they will object and try to get one of THEIR children to get the house instead (even though no one else has said they have any interest in it).

It's all just a bunch of messy family drama. I was just wondering, legally, once the deed is in my mom's sole name, and I move in, if my aunts could force some legal action in objection.

Just a little background, the reason I want the house is I was the closest person to my grandma (in our entire family really). She even raised me for part of my life. I never planned to try to get her house after she passed, but once she was gone, I got a distinct feeling that that was where I belonged. Plus, it is larger than my current home and my husband and I are expecting our first child in October and that house is the perfect family house.

Anyway, probably more info than anyone wanted to know, but thanks again for answering! I agree, I didn't THINK my aunts would be able to do anything once the house is deeded to my mom, but wanted to see if someone else knew something I didn't.
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WritersLife, once your Mom pays her two sisters their share of the equity, and the house is legally Deeded over to your Mom... her two sister no longer have a say regarding the house.

Was this the family home where your Mom and her sister grew up? If so, the sisters might still feel in their mind that is still "home" and will voice their opinion if your Mom makes any changes to the house.... that's only human nature.

But if in future you think this house will be a bone of contention, maybe to keep the peace it might be better to sell the house outright to a Buyer and then split what is left of the equity [after closing costs] between the three of them.
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I'm not a lawyer, and possibly this is a legal question, but in my opinion, I would say they have no more say than if she'd just bought the house outright from a stranger. What kind of problems is your mother anticipating? Do you mean that she might want to sell the house and the aunts would object?

Once the house is sold to your mother, and the deed is recorded, they shouldn't have any say about anything done with the house. That is my opinion for what it's worth.
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