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She lives in an attached apartment. I work and am often sick.

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Your local senior commission likely offers a number of activities, but your mom may need someone to take her. If you can't take her to functions, you could hire a caregiver from a local agency just for that purpose. These people take the care receiver for groceries and other shopping and to events if that is what is wanted. Look into this and see what can be done.
Take care of yourself, too.
Carol
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Mom just tried her first day at Daycare. Since I don't like that word, I say Adult center to her. She was iffy about it mainly the activities. With Dementia, she has lost the ability to comprehend. Told her if she didn't want to do the activities she didn't have to. They were for the different people who were there, some mentally challenged. Some her age probably have the same problem. Explained that she says she is bored and this is a place to socialize and have nice breakfast and lunch. Trying again Tuesday. They transport and give showers no extra cost.
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For my mom, having a daytime caregiver has been a godsend. Both the caregiver & I (when I am able to visit at least 5 times per week) take mom for a walk around the neighborhood in her wheelchair. Mom loves the change of scenery, greeting her neighbors and commenting on the flowers & various decorations. The goal is to get mom outside for a walk at least twice a day so she gets a change of scenery and fresh air. Her mood, awareness, focus and conversational skills are always so much better after each walk!
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I have another thought if your mom is like mine was (she hated the thought of going somewhere to socialize) how about someone to come in and 'visit' with her at home? We had a wonderful volunteer that came every week to 'visit' with her up until my mom died. In fact, because of her I'm thinking of volunteering to do the same thing. I'm on disability and can't do much, but I can be a good visitor and I can give the caregiver a break as I know all the stages of Alz. and maybe I can re-pay some of the kindness that was shown to us. Blessings, Lindaz
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Check with your local Council On A, they should have a list of things you could try, My Mom goes to the daycare a couple days a week and it really helps.
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My mom had been isolated in the house pretty much for years except for doctor's appointment. When I came to stay about 6 months ago we had some in home care. Then we started going to the senior center for lunch. Now she is going to Adult day care. She is coming out of her she'll little by little. She made a friend who is deaf and can't speak but they find a way to communicate. Hope this helps.
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I second the suggestion womenofGod makes. An adult day health program is an awesome option! Many programs pick up and bring home the participant, provide a simple breakfast and a hot lunch and snacks. Some also offer services such as nail care and showers (for an extra fee.) They help participants to the bathroom, are prepared to handle accidents, and offer activities. Good ones also allow for the participants to pass on the activities. Sometimes they have field trips to restaurants or a ballgame or a park. They are generally available from one to five days a week. This was a really good opportunity for my husband to socialize a bit. It is surprising how much difference it can make to have another adult say, "New shirt today? That color is good for you!"

Medicaid generally covers these programs. Sometimes the programs have "scholarships" for those who can't afford to self-pay.

If there is such a program in your area, I urge you to check it out. It is a nice "club" -- even if the participant is reluctant.
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JoAnn29, I sure hope the Day program is as helpful for your mom as it was for my husband. They do not generally call it daycare. Officially it is Adult Day Health Program. Many caregivers refer to it as the Club.

My husband never got to the point where he admitted liking it, but I could still tell it was good for him!
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Check out and see if there is an "Alzheimer's Cafe" in your area. Sponsored by the Alzheimer's Foundation - the programs are hosted in a variety of locations. One near me is at the local Art Museum 1 or 2 days a month. Gives patient and caregivers a chance to enjoy a day out. Mom doesn't have Alzheimer's, so I don't have first hand knowledge but several of my friends at the support group have tried them.
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There is a new service called PhonePals for Seniors that you should look into. I recently signed my mother up for it and she loves it and she has dementia. What they do is call her 5 days a week for about an hour each day. The same exact person calls her each time so there is a trust and comfort level. PhonePals has been so incredibly helpful. They don't just give my mom someone to talk to, they give her a friend that truly makes her a priority and it takes a lot of stress/pressure off of me. As a bonus, PhonePals for seniors also sends her a gift in the mail once a month to remind her that she is being thought of.

hopefully this can help someone as much as it has helped me
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