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My aunt is in a PA state home. She is dying.

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OK, she is on Medicaid in PA? That means you buy it from her estate at fair market value. Sorry, that is the law.
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Jessiebelle

A car can be easily transferred after the death of the owner, if the owner has on the title Transfer on Death, with the name of the person the owner wants to give the car to.

This way, the car does not have to go through probate where it would be listed as an asset and could be used to pay off any claims submitted to the estate by creditors.
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While she is living, in order to transfer title to an auto for which you are not listed as the owner, you would need authority pursuant to a Power of Attorney or Guardianship by the court, unless the owner is competent and can sign the transfer herself. If you are Executor of the Will, then, she must be deceased first, and then there is a process for inheriting assets through the Probate court.

I would consult with an attorney before transferring titles, deeds, assets, etc. for someone who was very ill, especially, if she is receiving any kind of funds like Medicaid LTC or Medicaid medical. It could have an impact on it.
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car in your name.
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bryan1

If your aunt has any outstanding debts, her estate will probably be probated. The car would then become an asset to her estate and may be sold to pay off any outstanding debts ( listed as a claim against the estate), unless you or your family could cover any debts. After estate is closed, then you could go about transferring the
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I haven't dealt with a car before, but I imagine that it will be handled like other assets. Did your aunt have a will? If so, was the car (or general assets) left to you? Who is the executor/trix of the will? When your aunt passes, assets will go through an orderly process of being distributed that is managed by the executor/trix. Creditors will have the first claim on the estate. This includes Medicaid, credit cards, banks, etc. If your aunt didn't have any debt, the car should transfer easily. If she did have debt, her creditors will have to make a decision if the car is worth pursuing. If it is a Rolls Royce, they may. If it's a 2001 Toyota, probably not. :)

I hope someone will be by soon that has dealt with transferring a car. They will be able to tell you how much time it could take.
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If aunt is on Medicaid, you need to make sure there is not a lien on the vehicle before you attempt to transfer it unless it is specifically given to you. Your aunt would need to sign paperwork to gift an asset like car to you and that might disqualify her for Medicaid. Double check before you do anything.
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If there's not a Will that designates it to go elsewhere OR a closer family member who objects to your having it,,,,,you will likely be able to submit a death certificate to get it transferred. Call your state department of motor vehicles.
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