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My mom's physical health is a little below average. What makes her so weak and tired? She has no energy. She has the desire to do things but is so tired. Is there something physiological that occurs with aging that has nothing to do with vitals, blood levels, etc? I kinda look at it like a car...the body may look bad but the motor is still good. Thoughts are appreciated.

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I am amazed that people just do not want to accept that our hair turns grey and thin, our skin gets thin and bleeds, we DON'T have as much energy and we die.

I do light exercise and whatever I can to stay healthy but I am much happier now that I accept I am old and do what I reasonably can and not worry about what I can't do.
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Hi
Praise the lord for her good health and will to do! Give her a senior one a day vitamin (bury it in 6 oz.organic greek yogurt t will slide down really easy ) then sign her up for a senior exercise class we see seniors evertday tossing walkers and canes and getting more energy!
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Well I have Chronic Fatigue syndrome, so I'm tired all the time! (Sometimes I think my elderly relatives are more fit than I.) Getting her checked for low thyroid is a good idea, and also if she is taking any blood pressure medicines - they are notorious for causing weakness and fatigue. If she does not get any exercise, her muscles will get smaller and therefore weaker. Maybe she could do the sitting exercises - Amazon has DVDs. Make sure she gets enough protein as well. Other than that - it is just aging. My parents fall asleep in the chair more often and even my elderly pets snooze more than usual!
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I am 69, I look after my mom who is 93, and I do not even have the energy level I had or would like! But with mom, her main problems are that she has congestive heart failure and only one good, functioning kidney, plus her bone marow is not doing it's job in manufacturing hemoglobin, so she has to have a transfusion every 2 - 3 weeks, during which time she gets weaker and weaker. It does not leave much room for a good quality of life. She had a thyroidectomy years ago and is on synthroid, and her 'need' varies from day to day it seems, which contributes to her weakness.
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I will mention this again, since the information contained is for UNEXPLAINED fatigue.

The National Institue on Aging has quite a few articles on fatigue that are worth a read.

http://www.nia.nih.gov/researchinformation/conferencesandmeetings/unexplainedfatigue

"Tired of Being Tired" by Michael A Schmidt is an informative book on why 'anyone' gets tired, and may be helpful for you to read with regards to your mother's lack of energy. It has opened my eyes regarding my own fatigue, and I am just 58 year old!

I do hope this helps. Why not try to reorient your mothers day? Get up at the same time, but try breakfast in the sunshine, or out in a restaurant.

Review sleep habits, the better we sleep, the better we feel the next day. My mother was active up until the last 5 months of her life! It was difficult keeping her in one place, she wanted to be busy! I could have welcomed a bit more fatigue (big grin). Of course I loved to see her active too!

Make sure your 'home' is fatigue resistant! Plenty of natural light, fresh air, not too cold, not too hot, and (mildly) stimulanting surroundings.

Food allergies can also trigger fatigue. These allergies can develop as our physical bodies change.

I found that the more I looked into why "I" was tired the more I improved my mothers health too! ALL caregivers need to keep their energy up too, so all of us will benefit from this discussion. God Bless.
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My mom is also very tired most of the time ... good bloodwork, good thyroid test, not depressed, GREAT appetite. She doesn't take any medications at all. She always asks me, "Why am I so tired?" I usually tell her that it's probably because she is almost 88 years old and tiredness must go hand in hand with getting older....I think it just takes the elderly more effort to move around and that is tiring.
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I just visited my MIL tonight in a dementia care unit and noticed that many of the residents were dozing in their chairs. I wondered too, about aging and " tiredness" and why they always seem so tired. My MIL is on medication for hypothyroidism, so that's not it. They have a carefully balanced diet there, not like at home where one may only eat snacks. ( MY MIL tried to do that). I think depression may play a role.
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I just opened up this e-mail and planned to write on this very topic. I guess I'm home here. My mother is 89 and has all her wits about her. The cardiologist says her heart is fine; she has some mild renal insufficiency. Her eating is not great, as I've posted before, but her weight has been the same for the last few months. Last night her legs gave out and she fell to the floor; she didn't pass out; her legs just gave out. She hit her head, cut herself a bit, but was seemingly ok today. She's seeing the doctor tomorrow. Is there such a thing as it's just being age? I am scared to death. We just lost my father 4 months ago. I don't know how I am going to handle taking care of my mother now. I will, but it's so hard. It is so hard.
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If obvious physical illnesses are ruled out as the source for your mother's fatigue, then I hope her physicians will check for signs of depression. My mother becomes discouraged by the limitations placed upon her by age, and she becomes depressed with resulting fatigue until her self-worth is restored. Also, I can recognize a difference in my energy levels now that I am over 55. When I make exercise a priority, my energy increases but is not at previous levels. I hope you can find solutions for your mother's tiredness. I think she is very blessed to have someone care about her. Rebecca
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I am 77 years 9 months old. I have times I get more tired than others. If I am a couch potato too long, I feel too weak to make a move to get up. Does the patient get up and down often just to stay stronger?
Also, another reason I feel tired more than other days, is when the weather is in the 90's like it is all this week I feel weaker than I do when days are cooler. I cannot keep my A/C on high constantly as I have arthritis and it hurts me in a cold environment. So I have to take the hot weather and stay inside a lot. At least it is cooler than 90 degrees.
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to ginamahoney: your MIL cannot help what is happening to her, she tries to walk because she wishes she could. she is probably more unhappy than you are, because of her condition. Do what you can with her and for her and then ask someone to come in for a day or so with her (or even a week so you can go to beach) and rest up. All caregivers need a break now and then. once in a while see yourself in a few (precious) years and try to be good to her, you will never look back and regret it. I did not ever regret doing for my mom and she was much like your MIL. Good luck and God bless you
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Even though your mom is having blood work done, if a thyroid test is not specifically requested this vital area might be overlooked. Check with your mother and/or her doctor as soon as possible. Thousands of people live life never realizing they are suffering from either hypo or hyperthyroidism.
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What can you do for someone with stage 6-7 dementia and they will not and do not want to do anything. My MIL babbles about nothingness all day and tries to walk and she cannot. We spend the whole day being worn out due to continuously redirecting and prompting her. She no longer understands what we are asking her to do.
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There are MANY causes for fatigue in the elderly and I read scores of articles online and have a few books on 'tired of being tired' mostly bought for myself.

"Tired of Being Tired" by Michael A Schmidt is an informative book on why 'anyone' gets tired, and may be helpful for you to read with regards to your mother's lack of energy.

The National Institue on Aging has quite a few articles on fatigue that are worth a read.

http://www.nia.nih.gov/researchinformation/conferencesandmeetings/unexplainedfatigue.htm#summary

Start with the most basic things in her life. Does she sleep well, eat well, get enough fresh air and sunshine, etc.

Then have her doctor run the proper blood work and tests to check for deficiencies. In SO many cases simple changes make the biggest difference. Have her doctor explain what should/could be done to help her feel more energetic.

Magnesium is one of THE biggest deficiency, as is B6, B12 deficiencies. I am NOT a doctor but I found that making positive changes in my Mothers diet increased her energy when all else failed.

Do some research, talk to her doctor, review "Mom's" bloodwork with the doctor and then ask what (s)he recommends nutritionally.

You can and should keep track of your/Mom's eating habits to see if both of you are getting the proper nutrition. This would help a doctor in recommending supplementation or changes in diet.

I am not a nutritional expert, but I really believe we ARE what we eat! Add that to the 'processing factory' (our body) and the working order of the body and that equals the energy we have to carry on our days.

I hope this helps. And God bless!
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The physical body is not in "good" health when the body has no energy. There is a fundamental recognition that all living beings are animated by a "vital" force which when disturbed leads to sickness and loss of energy. The vital force can be blocked in many ways. Another way of thinking is that a gland, organ or body system is not functioning properly. So we begin by simply looking at the nutrition of your mother. Fresh fruits and vegetables are essentials in her daily diet. Secondly is the appropriate vitamins and minerals. I test by the use of a pendulum. Third is of utmost importance and that is 2-3 colonics to rid the body of toxins that may have built up in the colon over the years. Massage and reflexology must be considered in order to stimulate the body. Your mother needs ample water without clorine or floride. Last but always first is her spiritual life; the daily reading of positive affirmations and prayer. Depression in elders sets in when they do not feel their life is worth living. A counselor who understands the purpose in life should be considered.
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Speaking for myself, I have less energy than when I was younger, and it makes me mad! But what you are talking about seems to be more than slowing down with age. Being tired and weak can accompany a whole range of diseases and conditions. Are there any other symptoms, any other changes in your mom? Have you discussed this with her doctor?

A possibility that comes to mind is depression. If you are not familiar with that, look up the typical symptoms and think about whether this is something to consier.
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