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Has anyone found that old childhood favourites appeal to them, in the same way as familiar music might?
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Reply to Countrymouse
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There is no food that is known to slow or improve dementia. And there is no food known to make it worse. So stay with what they ate before, or what they seem to like now. In fact, many experts advise being even less restrictive than previously, if they were on a special diet. Maybe it isn't so important to stay on a heart-healthy diet now, or maybe they can loosen up some on carb restrictions if they have diabetes. Definitely discuss this with the doctor before launching this change, but I know that is the attitude of many doctors.

If the dementia has lead to swallowing problems, then some attention to the texture of the food may be recommended. Follow that if the person can tolerate it.

Try to keep meal time pleasant. No arguments over food!
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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Unless on a special diet, whatever they ate before. Try to keep it healthy but don't force them to eat what they don't want to. They will tend towards the sweets. I have been told its instant gratification for them. They need to be kept hydrated. You can suppliment their meals with Boost. Chocolate maybe best and COLD. If you put it in the freezer for a while, it will thicken up like a milkshake. Good. Remember, the elderly don't eat much because they aren't active.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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