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They are on Medicare and also has additional health insurance. Will need hospital bed, wheel chair, walker, bath chair, etc

Do know that if you have a senior coming home on Hospice Care at all, they will often get the hospital bed for you if one is required for care; that would make it covered by insurance. I hope others have some good ideas for you.
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Reply to AlvaDeer
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My mom fractured her hip years ago. Just prior to discharge you will have a family meeting. The home equipment should be obtainable. My mom got a walker , bath chair, and wheelchair rented out under Medicare. She did not need a hospital bed.
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Reply to MACinCT
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Yes, the SW at the hospital should be able to help sort things out. Even order them for you.

I can't remember how it works but I do know Mediicare will not pay for everything you mention. I don't think they allow a hospital bed and a wheelchair. Something about having to be bed ridden. There is something about both covering a walker and a wheelchair. If I am right, you may want to purchase the cheapest items and let Medicare pay for the expensive ones. I know at one time they did not cover shower chairs.

Your suppliment may cover durable equipment.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Where I live in BC Canada, the doctor writes an order and the items are rented from our local Red Cross.

When Mum had her knee surgery she got a toilet riser, walked and bath chair. She did not need a wheel chair, nor hospital bed.
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Reply to Tothill
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Google Homecare equipment. Call and shop. Any company will help you thru needed equipment and paperwork. With your described insurance, you're good as gold. Google, call, shop.
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Reply to bolers1
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The social worker on site in the nursing home or rehab should be able to assist in ordering all DME (durable medical equipment) needed and file with medicare. Any equipment needed including oxygen would be delivered to the home. PT chose the proper heavy duty wheelchair and ergonomic seat cushion for dad. Before he was discharged all items needed were reviewed and ordered well ahead of time. I did not have to purchase or find anything myself. Dad needed a hospital bed, a heavy duty walker, bedside commode,(bath chair, grab bars & handicapped toilet were already in his apartment). oxygen unit with portable tanks for doctor visits. Be sure to ask for extended tubing if oxygen is needed. We also asked for a hospital type over the bed table for meals.
Hopefully you have caregiving help and need to stock up on disposable underwear, chux pads, gloves,
antibacterial supplies, hand sanitizer, bath wipes, bedside commode liners, barrier cream to start. All these items are easily found on Amazon.
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Reply to InFamilyService
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PTs and OTs in my experience have catalogues, and helped us choose appropriate devices.   And as Barb suggested, toward the end of the first rehab stint, both a PT and OT visited the home with us and made suggestions.

I don't recall what Medicare paid for or we bought ourselves, so that's a question that should be raised.   A Medicare qualified DME can bring things in a day or so, but if you have to buy anything yourself, you should plan to contact local DMEs to find out if what you need is available. 

My recollection is though that Medicare provided for a scripted hospital bed and wheel chair, but I don't recall about the walker.   I believe we had to purchase bath equipment out of our own pockets.   

You didn't mention a commode.  That might be something to consider as well, plus grabbers to pull on socks or reach other items.  

Another thing to consider if appropriate is a rotating, or  "egg carton" mattress, with capability to rotate different sections, the purpose of which is to avoid portions of the body being in contact too long with the same area, potentially rubbing ankles or other areas, and developing pressure ulcers.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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In order for it to be a "safe discharge" you should have an OT come to the home to make an assessment for safety and needed equipment.

The OT can then tell the MD what needs to be ordered.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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