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I am the POA on my father's account. He is almost 90 years old. He has an aide that goes grocery shopping for him weekly (he lives in a senior housing complex). Currently I take out cash for her to use for shopping. She is trustworthy and also provides all the receipts and change. My question is, does anyone have any suggestions on a prepaid credit card that she can use for grocery shopping? I believe it would be easier for her to use a prepaid credit card that I can load the money to and not have to worry about making regular cash withdrawals for her.

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I don't recommend a credit card for an elder, prepaid or not.
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Where I work we are currently working on a policy for how aides are to handle the funds for shopping. We would never allow an aide to take a consumers debit card for shopping. We do allow that they can use giftcards and take a check the consumer has filled out to a named store and the aide will then fill in the $ amount to equal the amount of the purchases. They are not allowed to write it for over and get cash back and they are not allowed to purchase Alcohol, Tobacco or Lottery Tickets.
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I would look into the BlueBird card that walmart offers. There are no fees. Even banks charge fees for a prepaid card, and to get those visa etc cards there is a loading fee on some. I have a BlueBird card, I put my savings catcher money on it through Walmart, but you can load it and I do not believe there are fees attached.
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I use Amex Serve prepaid card for transactions I do not want tied to my bank account (like the kids purchasing xbox games online). If you have a monthly electronic deposit to fund the card it's free or $4.95(no other fees) if you load the card at a Walmart or CVS register (and other stores too). You can even load it with a digital deposit of a check. You can have sub-accounts with their own cards - each with a different number. I load money into the main account monthly and then transfer money into each kid's sub-account as needed. Unless you set up a separate checking account with just the grocery money, I do not recommend using a debit card tied to a checking account because if that card number is compromised in a scam then the checking account can be emptied. I like Amex Serve because of the limited and well documented fees, multiple easy loading options, online management options and flexibility. When you load money at a store register it is available immediately - electronic transfers from you bank and check deposits take a couple of days to be available.
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I swear by American Express Serve - you can get alerts when the balance falls below a certain amount and if you live in New York, you do not pay the small monthly fee. I use it with my 99 yr. old Aunt.
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What store does she use? Most now have "credit/debit" cards and you can just add the amount weekly or monthly.

I know you can do this with Walmart so there must be other stores as well.
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I used a card called True Link for my dad. It was perfect for this purpose. It had a monthly fee, but the features of the card made it worth it to us. Tracking and loading is really easy and it lets you block specific businesses or categories of businesses. It provided a layer of protection for dad's checking account.
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My daughter's father got her a visa gift card and he just loads money on it whenever she needs
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All the ways mentioned are great ideas ,but you can open another separate checking account where your dad does his banking, put a certain amount money onto a debit card from the bank and you only transfer the amount of money that is needed at a time you don't have to physically go to the bank you can do a transfer online or over the phone when the caregiver is going shopping for your dad,that way you keep tabs on the amount of money being spent, that's my suggestion
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As cwillie mentioned, it's actually best to go with whatever his bank offers. The absolute best card is your debit card attached to your bank account. That same card can be used at the ATM, but it's actually safer to run it as credit at the checkouts. You can use it just like any other card since it's actually the same as a regular pre-paid card except there are no fees for using it at the checkout. Of course there are ATM fees if you use ATMs outside of ones belong into your bank, but these days it's actually safer to just not carry cash. Using your debit card is actually more secure anyway and your bank keeps the records for you. Just make sure there's always money on the card but only enough for your basic needs. What I do is sweep all of my extra money into savings so that I can't overspend. Only having just enough money on my card for what I need for that shopping trip means I can't buy something I don't need or something not on my list. This is partly why I'm glad I went digital, and now I have a very nice savings and can live more comfortably. There are definitely perks to online digital banking, you can logon and put money on your card, but you can set limits. You can schedule automatic weekly transfers from your savings to a specific checking account. You can schedule the auto transfers for specific days. Let's say you shop on Mondays. You can set up your automatic transfers for every Monday. That's done by selecting a day that lands on Monday but it might fluctuate slightly because let's say your banking system only lets you choose a number within the month and you only shop on Mondays. This is where you can learn to adjust your schedule and just logon and check your balance. Of course if you insist on shopping on Mondays, you can manually transfer money in the amount you choose and my banking system anyway has it instantly available after confirming the transfer. I personally do all of my shopping only once a month. Having only one income and no outside financial help means my options are limited and I must stock up wherever I can find cheap or even free groceries. When I do shop though, I only use my debit card from my bank, and what do business with no one who doesn't take my debit card. There are some places I found out about in other parts of my state who require you to have a regular credit card and they don't take debit cards. Those are the very places I won't do business with. Having anything outside of what your bank offers puts you at risk of getting into debt because then you have a regular bill and I won't have that because I can't afford it. Another thing you can look into is opening an able account for your dad. Anything left over can be saved in the able account. That way, no one can touch it. As for the caregiver doing your shopping for you, be very careful with that. Many people who trust someone to do their shopping for them have been financially hurt, and there's always a first time. I personally would not like the idea, especially when I can go along on the trip and be with that caregiver to see what's going on and make sure everything is going as it's supposed to. I personally would go along and hold onto my card and run it myself after making sure that only what I requested was in that basket. I don't let no one touch my money, ever! If someone needs to help me shop, I go along and call the shots since I'm the one with the money. That way, you can make sure the person you're supposed to trust is not going to benefit themselves by sneaking stuff into the cart for themselves. Hard to believe, but elder financial abuse is very common, more common than people may realize until they themselves have someone in their own family who becomes a victim but it's often not discovered until that person dies. Your dad should be taking specific protective measures to protect himself at this stage in life. You as his POA need to be especially careful. That's because POA very often and very commonly get tempted with money, this happened with my bio dad who developed Alzheimer's and he had a POA. That POA ended up breaking the law and taking advantage of my dad and now I'm left dealing with the aftermath. Be very careful handling someone else's money, they're actually better if you don't and if you instead set them up to have their bills come out automatically from there and only and set up automatic transfers based on their needs. This is done through your banking website after you sign up for online access from your bank. This is done by speaking with a personal banker. I did this years ago so no one could touch my money and it would be more convenient and much easier for me. Online banking is actually better when you either don't feel like going out or when the weather is bad and you have certain health issues and lack of transportation. Let's say you don't have money for a cab and you don't use cabs anyway. Online banking from the comforts of home saves the day when you can't or don't want to go out. Let's say you need a loaf of bread from the store. Go online and put only the amount you need for that specific trip and leave the rest in savings. That way, you don't overspend and by nothing you don't need so therefore, you don't shop on impulse. This particular strategy actually saves more money than you realize and is probably the best strategy out there. That means your debit card if managed properly is actually the best card. The only thing you really need to do is to make sure your bank has your account set up to where you can't overdraft. If the money isn't there or there's not enough at the checkout, all you have to do is just put something back until the card approves. This is all you have to do anytime the card is declined when dealing with a prepaid debit card attached to your bank account. Never run this card as debit, that's because you don't want to share your pin. Only run it as credit by hitting enter for the green button as they say. Best of all, don't let no one touch your money or you may just as well kiss it goodbye and never see it again in many cases
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I agree with MissMemphis.
If there is one store that they shop get a gift card for that store the desired amount. You could do $100. if they spend all of it the card can be "reloaded" or you can buy another card. If they do not spend it all the amount will just be deducted from the total on the card.
Although check with the store on the policy. Some gift cards they will give you the change so if it is a $100 card and they spend $25 they may get $75 in change.
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Gift card for the grocery store. Some stores offer deals on their gift cards, like $5 gift card if you buy so many, or fuel points.
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I would go with whatever is offered through his bank, it should make it easy to top it up online when you do his other banking.
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