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Clare is in assisted living and unable to walk. The dentist this morning said she needs four crowns on her lower teeth. She has a full upper denture. Cost is over $4,000. Does it make sense to do this with her age and condition? Would a full denture make more sense, even though the cost might be higher?

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Crowns are 1000 to 1200 each. Some dentists make crowns while you wait with a 2 hour appointment and she has 4 teeth which would be longer. Full denture is about 2000 with minimum of 3 appointments. But she would need extractions and healing time. How would she deal with sitting in a chair? Did you ask if she could just take her chances with cavity fill? Be wary of dentists recommending implants. Dentist training does not include risks with medically fragile patients. Can you consider a dental clinic associated with a hospital?

Try to think conservative here. Ask what is absolutely necessary.
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Windy,

Makes sense to me.
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A lower denture is a horse of another color..........an upper denture is a cake walk by comparison! So, when a person winds up with both, chewing becomes a whole new adventure, and not a good one. If you can possibly prevent your DW from getting a lower denture, by all means do it. Even if it means leaving just the lower few front teeth so the dentist can create a partial plate for her, she'll be better off than going with a full lower plate. I will say, however, that a lower partial plate took me FOREVER to get used to, just a warning. With my 92 y/o mother, we just have the dentist pull the problem teeth because she refuses to put herself through the physical or financial pain of crowns, root canals or drilling of any kind. I love what Windyridge was able to accomplish with her mom! Brilliant idea
Best of luck!!
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Jim, my mom was 85 with a multitude of health, mobility problems and slight dementia. Her assisted living place sent here to a local dental mill who wanted to pull all her remaining teeth, then have her fitted for a full set of dentures.

Inwas able to find her old dentist who knew her well. He ground off some rough spots that were bothering her and put a little filling material in a couple places. It was an easy process and made her comfortable for the last year of her life instead of putting her through the trauma of oral surgery and dentures.

But that’s just one story. Your wife may well need the procedures recommended. But I do think we need to keep dental procedures to a minimum with elders.
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