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The social security office will not honor a POA, which my husband completed naming me his power of attorney; they request that he complete a Form SSA-1696-U4 to appoint a representative who can discuss his case with SS customer service. I have recently received information about Medical Assistance from the State of PA, but they would not discuss my husband's case with me until the SS office had on file that I was an authorized representative. The problem is my husband is in Stage 6 Alzheimer's, and cannot sign his name. What should I do? Thank you for the advice. Sandy

Can your husband make an "X?" My recollection (not 100% certain) is that the IRS will accept that as a signature, but I don't know about Social Security.
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Reply to caroli1
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Can your husband make an "X?" My recollection (not 100% certain) is that the IRS will accept that as a signature, but I don't know about Social Security.
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Reply to caroli1
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Try to do what I did when DW HAD to ssign her name for a Dr's office. The clerk took the form away from her after DW put eight "d's" on the end of her last name and had misspelled her first name. Then I was allowed to sign and answer questions.
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Reply to OldSailor
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I would get the paperwork that makes you his representative payee, this will help you deal with them as well as send the money to an account held solely by you. There is some accounting involved, so know what you are getting into before you file.

The paperwork clarifies all of this.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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Make it simple. Get the form, hold your husbsnd’s Hand and have him sign. I’ve been able to do that for my stepdaughter with SSA, Medicaid, and many medical offices.
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Reply to klgm326
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If you have documentation attesting to the fact that your husband is in Stage 6 Alzheimer’s, you can be named the “Designated Payee” at a local Social Security Administration Office, if you are near enough to one.
The process was a little time consuming, and the examination and documentation for my LO cost about $300, but it has turned out to be a MAJOR benefit to me as her major caregiver.
For unfortunate and unpleasant “family reasons” I have been operating 100% strictly “by the book” since undertaking my loved one’s care, and the formal documentation has bought me enormous peace of mind.
If you decide to go this route, be sure that the examiner (psychiatrist, social worker, physician, etc.) knows why you need this and what your end goal is.
The fee of guardianship documentation was more costly and more complicated and required an appearance before a judge, but that wasn’t what we needed, and sounds like it’s not what you need either.
The very fact that he has advanced dementia and the statement that an expert has acknowledged that as his status will hopefully be all you need to move forward.
I was very wary of “signing for” her or attempting to use her hand to sign because of even the potential that such a solution might be questioned.
If you’re like I am, you’ll no doubt realize at some point or another that some of this stuff comes down to being nonsense, but this particular solution has served my LO well. When I took the certificate to my local SS Office, they actually chose the forms that would work best for our situation and filled them out for me.
Hope you are equally as fortunate.
By the way, I was told my POA was not used by SS at all.
GOOD LUCK!
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Reply to AnnReid
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I can’t speak specifically about this form, but when my mom was unable to sign several needed legal forms following a stroke, my dad was told to hold her hand and sign it himself. He did this a number of times and it was never questioned
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Reply to Daughterof1930
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Like agings answer. All you can do is try.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Maybe I'm asking something you've already tried, but can't you complete the Form SSA-1694-U4 and just sign it for him as his POA? I think they won't talk to you as his POA, but they will let him (by you as POA) appoint you as his authorized representative. Then, as his authorized representative, you're good to go.

I know I was able to be appointed as authorized representative for my brother-in-law who was unable to sign. I had his POA. It was not a major hurdle, because I don't remember any problems with it at all; so it must have been the process I just described.
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Reply to Agingmyself
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