Follow
Share

He lives in a senior group house I take him to all his appts daughter/ gets his meds etc. He's not dying. They want me to sign him up for hospice to get a nurse and Medicare would stop I don't think I like that idea hes, not able to walk slight dementia 88 years old looks good

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
If his longstanding family MD says no Hospice, then NO HOSPICE. Push for better pain management without jumping to Hospice.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

He has arthritis pain I diffently like to keep his family doctor which communicates well with us all the time, the group home has a house doctor that the only time I met once in 6 months hasn't been ever able to reach when needed.so how would she be able to make decision on my dad's life his family doctor and I say no to having hospice at this time he's not dying anymore then I am remembers things sometimes better then me.i figure they want to not have to do as much there if he had it
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Oh, one more thought....I re-read this and see you believe he has 'slight dementia'. One state does this, the other does that. For crying out loud, this is one country. Why can't we just operate as one big country.

I'm also seeing he's on blood thinners plus B-12 shots? That's it? Is dementia his actual diagnosis or is the dementia one of the symptoms of something else?

I'm beginning to 'understand' that not all states have the same resources as others. And this is very sad given the number of people today who are living into the very old stage.

When are our medical experts, our medical wizards, our government wizards going to stop arguing about stuff other than the important stuff and that us, people, elders who need help! Caregivers who need help!

God, I wish there were a delete button or an edit button! :)

Aging Care, please place a delete or edit button...please?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

From what I understand, at least here, Hospice is starting dementia/Alz care for up to one year.

Having worked with Hospice, I think it's a wonderful idea. However, having said that, you're saying it's the group home doctor...yet another term I'm not familiary with. What is a group home?

Does he still have a personal doctor? What are the reasons given other than he'd be better off there? Is his swallowing starting to be affected, etc., etc. Looking good doesn't mean being good.

I'm coming from a different perspective in I believe people should be allowed to die naturally without the meds that are keeping the body alive when they have absolutely no understanding as to what is going on. Just because 'man' can do this doesn't mean it's natural.

And again, we all have different perspectives, which I believe makes it all interesting.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If your family Doctor said it isn't necessary, then that's it. A Doctor has to sign off on him entering the Hospice program. Medicare won't pay for it otherwise. The criteria is 6 months or less to live and comfort care only. He would be reevaluated in 6 months to remain in the program.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

You should might consider whether the hospice provider being recommended is a "for profit" versus a "non-profit" operation. The Washington Post newspaper recently did a series of articles regarding hospice care. There are many pros and cons regarding the type of agency providing the service. If the primary care physician doesn't think hospice is needed yet, I would be very cautious.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Do you trust the care he receives from this group home? It seems strange that your primary physician says he is fine yet they want hospice. It almost sounds as if they are running a scam where their house doc recommends hospice thereby getting their residents extra care which they don't have to provide.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Well, it might benefit your dad. Having extra attention is nearly always a good thing. I imagine that the B-12 shots would stop, and the blood thinners. He would be kept out of pain. (Is he in a lot of pain now?) He would have volunteer visit with him.

But whether it would benefit him or not, is he eligible for it? Does his family doctor think he is within 6 months of dying?

My husband died on hospice. It was wonderful, but we did not sign up until he was clearly near the end. My mother went on hospice in a nursing home. It, too, was a wonderful experience. Mom recovered and got off of hospice. Her neighbor in the NH is on hospice now, and it is especially nice because she has no family. A hospice staff person was in her room with her today. I hope the dear woman will not die all alone.

Hospice is a wonderful program, and can really be of great benefit for people who are dying. But it isn't for folks who would just like some extra attention.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

The group home says it would be benefit him but I asked his family doctor and we both agreed it isn't nessasary the group home has a house doctor that comes once a month to see patients but I feel she's only good for once a month b 12 shot or check his blood so he don't have to run for blood thinners but she doesn't always show up when you want her to I like my dad's family doctor we communicate well and I don't mind going with him he's still pretty good shape
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Hospice is for people who are dying. That is, a doctor confirms that the person has a condition that would usually result in death within 6 months. Hospice is paid for by Medicare.

Who is it that is encouraging you to sign your dad up for hospice? The Group Home? A hospice service? Dad's doctor? Something doesn't sound quite right here. Could you explain a little more?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.