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My Mother-in-law, age 96, seems to be depressed sometimes - other times expresses how happy her life has been, knowing she is living on borrowed time - what can in-home-hospice do for her? Recommended by her physician -

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I guess his is run by a health insurance company. They NEED those profits, right? :o(
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Wow Sign me up for that nursing home! Seriously though, not all hospice's are the same. There are for profit hospices and nonprofit hospices. I work for a smaller nonprofit. We do much more for our patients than the for profit one in my town does. We are not making a profit off of our patients so we provide more supplies and services.
Non profit hospices are run by a board of directors who volunteer their time. We are basically owned by the community who's donations help us provide services.
For profit hospices are owned by individuals or corp.s who keep patient care expenses down so that they make a bigger profit.
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Thank you yearight and Nataly 1 for the nice comment. Today I've been telling my friends about my wonderful experience last night.
Now, if my other friend in the nursing home who is on hospice received diapers, gloves, etc. I'd be so happy. But hospice said they didn't supply them. After 9 years in a nursing home/really, assisted living, he's gone through most of his money. I hope he has enough to stay where he is until the end. It's a private pay facility, but such a wonderful place. Very homey, with a loving, caring staff.
(plus, I can enjoy a glass or two of wine when visiting!)...not many places that have wine and beer readily available for residents and visitors!)
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Zoomer, you capture what hospice is all about. I am so sorry for your loss. My mother who has dementia was on and off hospice for the past 5 years. She got discharged because "she didn't decline" fast enough. The hospice services were incredible. Hospice provided for all of mom's daily needs such as diapers, gloves, pads and medications. They sent an aide over daily to help with mom's bathing. The nurse visited regularly and when needed, the doctor made a house call. I became a good friend with the social worker and when ever she would ask me,"what could she do for me?" I would say to her," pick up the dry cleaning, go grocery shopping, pick up the kids, make dinner. . . " We'd laugh because she was married and pregnant- not going to happen in this lifetime. The reality is that hospice is not just physical place, it's an emotional place and a life line. Hospice can be in your home or hospital or where ever your loved one lives. The services that they will provide will vary depending on the persons needs and the services that they provide. Nobody ever wants to think end of care- or end of life.- hospice services are about current quality of life.
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Zoomer, what a wonderful post that you have shared. And i am sorry for your lose.
060256, Zoomers post shows hospice in motion. I am a hospice employee of many years. We do all that Zoomer shared and so much more. Please consult with the hospice in your area for your mother in law. No one should ever face a terminal diagnosis without the help of a good hospice.
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Hospice is wonderful. I just returned from a nursing home where
my neighbor died tonight. During the 2+ hours I was there, people came in to check her oxygen, re-position her. A lady came in with a guitar and played and sang some hymns, and we were encouraged to join in if we wanted. About 5 minutes before she died, a hospice nurse came in, put lotion on her face, arms and moistened her lips, encouraged us to say our good-byes, and stayed with us for about 5 minutes before she left us alone with the body. She also encouraged the son to call her any time.
My father died at home with hospice too, and my mother still talks about how nice they were...calling her after the funeral, contacting her regularly during the first year.
I also have a dear friend who's now on hospice after being in the nursing home for 9 years. A chaplain stops in to visit several times a week, a hospice nurse stops in regularly, a visitor comes and sits with him....and best of all, they took him off all meds, but give him atavan if he gets agitated, and pain meds if he's in pain. They just keep them as comfortable as they can. And I'm encouraged to call any of them at any time. To me, they show how beautiful death can be. yes, it's a sad time, but if you're a believer, you know they're going to a better place. No more suffering, no more tears.
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