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I have noticed here, that some care givers are either actually disabled in some way, or become so ill, it effects the caring they are able to give? What do you do when you are not %100 and others are depending on you?

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There are a number of options ~ from asking a friend or neighbor to help, adult day centers or respite care (provided by a community organization or an agency). Some facilities also reserve rooms for people who need respite care for a short period of time. Check with (or join) an Alzheimer's support group as they may already have a list of such programs/possibilities so you'll shorten your learning gap. I helped my father care for my mother for many years (she died Dec. 2007) so this is coming from someone who has "been there, done that." I ignored my own health ~ and sanity ~ until I finally hit a brick wall. My father did the same thing and, 2 years after Mom died, we found out how bad HIS health had taken a hit. So, please, take care of YOU!
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Were you able to find a solution to your concern. My suggestion is that you can ask someone else to care for them until you regain your health, or you can find a permanent place for them in a nursing home. If your health is declining, it may be a sign of your body trying to tell you it's time to relieve yourself of caregiving duties. This may be difficult to hear, but it's important to take care of yourself.
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