Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
I carry a couple of copies of my mother's POA with me at all times. The original is in my files at home.

I never know when I'll be called and told she's been sent to the hospital. It came up again just three weeks ago when I got the call at 11 p.m. and had to hot-foot it to the ER to meet the ambulance there. I was in a dead sleep when the phone rang, and I guarantee you I wouldn't have had the presence of mind to remember to bring the paper with me if it wasn't already in my purse. It was the first thing they asked me for when I walked into the ER.

I would add that you should get separate powers of attorney set up at your financial institutions, because they don't seem to like the ones attorneys that aren't their own set up. I had to get separate POA forms done for my parents' bank and at Charles Schwab for their investments, and they took a little time to get done, so do it before you need it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If the only come into effect when the person is no longer competent to make informed decisions, then just file away where you keep all your important papers. When they become effective, then a copy will be given to those who need them. Doctors, banks, hospitals etc.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I would add that safe and secure should infer a fireproof safety box if documents are kept at home.

As to copies, one of the attorneys I worked for always provided for "conformed copies".   These are extra copies of documents, stamped as "conformed", in which all parties have signed.     It avoids making photocopies of the original documents.   I've used conformed copies thus far for any need that's arisen to provide care documents.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Make copies and safely secure the origional. You may use them for his doctors office and insurance issues. If your husband is still competent, you and he fill out forms together with insurance.

One other thing, call probate and ask if you need to file the paperwork for the certification stamp. Some states require this and the filing fee is minimal. This protects you if some mischevious person wants to override with another POA.
I recently certified mom mom's papers to transfer guardianship to another state. Her financial advisor also wanted the updated certification copy as she has been incompetent for 6 years.

With the extra copies, keep one with his medical info such as a file of life that should be on the refrigerator just in case of emergencies
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I am not certain what you mean. Is your husband currently suffering from dementia and unable to transact business on his own? Did you do these with your husband in a Lawyer's office? You keep the original someplace safe with you, and make copies. You will need these papers when you go to the bank to transact any business or any payments for your husband under authority of your POA. Say you are going to open a CD, or renew a CD. Were your husband to enter a convalescent hospital and be incapacitated to sign for himself you would be asked to sign as his POA; you would need your papers with you. Same for a Hospital. There is much information online about how to sign for your husband as his POA. The Government also puts out a small phamplet on acting as POA.
I hope this in some way answered?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Keep the originals in a safe and secure place but I would also may a copy of them and keep that were I could easily get to it in case of emergency (like a trip to the ER). Yes, the hospital will eventually need to see the original but a copy will give them even to provide emergency care if it is needed.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Keep them in a safe & secure place that way you know where they are when you need them.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Ask a Question
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter