Follow
Share
There are some more complex and likely expensive options, including installation (only by a carpenter) of a sling into the ceiling studs; it can be pulled down for the patient in bed to hold onto to provide stability while someone assists in transferring to a commode.

There are also metal devices, shaped like an upside down U, that can be slipped under a mattress (and secured, but I'm not sure how) for the individual to hold onto while transferring to a commode.   This does require leaning on the U device though, so strength would be a consideration.

A hospital bed might even be considered as it could provide more stability to turn while in bed, and lean on while transferring.

I would research these devices, then ask one of your physicians if she/he would script for them.   I don't know w/o researching whether or not Medicare would pay for them, but it's worth a try.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to GardenArtist
Report

May want to consider adult pull ups if you have not already. I know you will have to change ...but may be an option so bathroom trips are less frequent. I did this with my husband because it got to the point I could no longer assist or lift to go to bathroom. I also had portable commode in bedroom next to bed. I did not want to risk him falling so the less distance traveled, the better.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to gpw7900
Report
Grandma1954 Mar 11, 2021
"Pull-up's" are difficult to change when a person is in bed. Using a Tab brief is a better option.
(1)
Report
May want to consider adult pull ups if you have not already. I know you will have to change ...but may be an option so bathroom trips are less frequent. I did this with my husband because it got to the point I could no longer assist or lift to go to bathroom. I also had portable commode in bedroom next to bed. I did not want to risk him falling so the less distance traveled, the better.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to gpw7900
Report

Sit to Stand if the person has some upper body strength and can stand a bit.
Hoyer Lift if they have no muscle strength.
Hoyer Lift while it looks difficult it was amazing. It was very easy to move my Husband around, change the bed, shower him, clean him and change his brief. Easy to get him into his wheelchair.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to Grandma1954
Report

When I had a CNA come in the mornings to transfer my bedridden husband from the hospital bed to his bedside commode, she always used a gait belt. She made it look so easy, but of course they are trained how to use them. You can also use a Hoyer lift, but if your house is carpeted, I was told by my husbands hospice nurse that it would ruin your carpet.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to funkygrandma59
Report

We use a Hoyer lift for my paralyzed dad. It works great but does require some training to get the hang of.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to SnoopyLove
Report

Ask a Question
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter