Follow
Share

But will not have more therapy. They are garnishing her savings. We both use it at times for bills and rent. I have small SSDI every month. I can't afford aides. I will need a bed and hoyer lift if she comes home. She doesn't have dementia, just forgets sometimes. She is afraid to walk or stand. I don't know what to do...

I am assuming the person is refusing Rehab. If you can't physically care for this person, tell the Social Worker they can't come home. Medicare will pay the first 20 days 100%.

Who is "they". No one can garnish without a court order. And if garnishing it is for an old debt.

Need more info.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

Is she still in the hospital?? I hope so because you need to VERY firmly state that you can provide this level of care at home. No way, no how. She needs to be in a rehab facility. How many nights did she spend in the hospital? How old is she?

If she needs a hoyer lift, she should not be coming home. When my mom had knee replacements, I said she needed to be able to get into the house and walk the distance from her bedroom to the bathroom without assistance. Then and only then could she come back to my house. You do not want a bedbound person being 100% dependent upon you for EVERYTHING. It's just waaaay too much.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to againx100
Report

Something is missing here. Please provide more details on the finances, specifically how are they garnishing her savings? Medicare will cover some of the rehabilitation costs, has she used up her allotted Medicare? If it is not safe and there is insufficient coverage at home, the case manager should know that, what is their care plan for her at home? What did the social worker and case manager say?
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to mstrbill
Report

"I am caring for my mother, living at home with age-related decline, anxiety, arthritis, depression, heart disease, lung disease, mobility problems, osteoporosis, urinary tract infection, and vision problems."

Sounds like her care is way beyond you now.

Tell us more, and we can help you develop a plan.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to CTTN55
Report

You shouldn't take her home. Her care is way beyond what you will be able to do. I don't know who told you that she doesn't have dementia and "she just forgets sometimes." That describes dementia. Maybe early dementia, but once they start forgetting sometimes, it only gets worse.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to Fawnby
Report

If you need a Hoyer Lift it does not sound like she is ready to be discharged to home.
A Hoyer Lift "technically" should have 2 people operating it. (although in the home it can be done with 1 person but they can be unwieldly and until you are used to it 1 person is a little "iffy")
She should go to inpatient rehab
The hospital bed can be ordered by her doctor. the Hoyer lift should also be provided by Dr order but again I stress that it is not an easy piece of equipment to use right off the bat.
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to Grandma1954
Report
Fawnby Oct 21, 2022
Good advice. Often a Hoyer lift is recommended for home health care that's supposed to be done by a relative, and there's no real warning about how hard it is for one person to use. Instead of expecting it, they should recommend that if a Hoyer is needed, the person can't go home but needs to stay in a care facility. I'm frequently shocked and outraged at what is expected of relatives. Shots in the stomach. Shots anywhere else. Shifting the patient from bed to wheelchair to car to wheelchair to doctor's office, then all over again to get them home. NO. Just NO.
(1)
Report
"But will not have more therapy".

Why not? Is this a funding issue? Pain? Behaviour/lack of cooperation/cognition issues?

What is the expected outcome, or expected mobility as advised by the Physiotherapist? Has the PT recommended hoist transfer? Why?

I would think in-patient rehab would be the plan if she is not suitable for home-with-visiting-Physio.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to Beatty
Report

If you cannot care for her or it is unsafe, then please tell the social worker to help plan for Medicaid. She should qualify for nursing home care, which can be stopped if she gets better. The downside will be that they will keep her SSDI except for maybe $40 for personal things. This will cut into you. Can you go back to work? Can you take in a renter? You should contact the local counsil on aging as suggested for more options.
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to MACinCT
Report
caroli1 Oct 21, 2022
Since the OP is getting SSDI, he is apparently disabled and so he can't work.
(0)
Report
Medicare/private insurance might pay for skilled nursing at home if her primary care physician orders it. Is she on medicaid?
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Catskie62
Report

Contact your local area's Agency on Aging, or social services for her county. If her doctor recommends her for LTC then she can apply for Medicaid (most states' Medicaid only pays for LTC but a few states will cover other care so research it for her state).
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Geaton777
Report

The nursing home is charging for her fees. She is expected to pay for her care. Try social services in your county to see if there are resources to help with rent and bills. Look into Medicaid to pay for her nursing home. Medicare may pay or bed and hoyer lift. See if she is eligible for Hospice. Can you work at all? Perhaps a part-time job?
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Becky04469
Report
JoAnn29 Oct 21, 2022
Sounds like OP can't afford aides and may not be able to do the care needed.
(0)
Report
Ask a Question
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter