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Has been diagnosed over 10 years with Parkinson’s. Well lately nothing can get him a good nights rest. It is almost like he has a nighttime dementia. On the bed off the bed, change pillows at least 100 times per night. He can’t get comfortable at all...he goes from recliner to bed and back and forth all night. When on the bed he goes into at least four positions just to get to a spot where he thinks he will be comfortable only to get so exhausted from moving that he needs to get up again. He very rarely takes naps during the day and keeping him up and active all day doesn’t help. Sleeping pills don’t work anxiety pills don’t work. It’s so crazy at night and I can’t even explain the rituals of pillow movements we do all night long. I’ve tried keeping to a bedtime schedule like suggested I’m exhausted and feel so horrible for how he must feel...please someone give me a suggestion.

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Happy about the doc appointment, Kariey. Please keep us updated. As you can see, this is a common problem, and we learn from each other.
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Thank you everyone for your replies! To answer most of your questions...my husband rarely take naps during the day...we have just purchased an adjustable bed. In the store he felt it would do wonders, unfortunately he hates it. I will be getting those beaded pillows that’s a good idea. The reason why I am awake with him during the night is he wants only me with him. If I’m in another room he keeps calling out for me which will wake our daughter. We are going to the neurologist again at the end of next week.
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My spouse has been in ALZ care for a year. He no longer recognized his family and had became angry, no one in the house could sleep. I understand from the staff that he is still up walking most of the night than sits down and sleeps for 3 hours in a chair. They are trying different meds to see if they can resolve the problem.
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Kariey: The following suggestions may be helpful--
#1 He MUST see his physician stat.
#2 You should sleep separately from him, else face exhaustion.
#3 Consider a new mattress, e.g. a Tempurpedic or an adjustable.
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Have you tried Melatonin 3-5mg.When you are older your body doesnt always make enough of it.Other question.Does he nap a lot during the day? If ,yes.Find activities that may keep him alert;something mentally stimulating a simple puzzle for example.
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My DH has LBD and similar problems falling asleep. We've come up with a solution that works for us.
1. We got adjustable twin beds. Whenever he begins to get restless, I change the angle of the bed using the remote. This seems to help tremendously. It also has a vibrate feature and I can turn it on and off as needed.
2. I got him a couple of microbead pillows. They are small and supplement his regular pillow. They squish around easily and he moves them to whatever body part that annoys him.
3. I got him polyester sheets instead of cotton. They allow him to make movements easier than cotton sheets. I've considered getting satin sheets as the next step.
4. We spend almost 12 hours in bed (8:30-8:30) in order to get enough rest. We don't sleep all of that time, but with off and on sleep, we get enough. (I hate this part, but it works).
5. The doc prescribed (at my insistence that we try it) Tylenol #3 at bedtime. It is a low dose of codeine and has the double benefit of mild pain relief and drowsiness. He doesn't take it every night, but when he's especially restless, it is wonderful.
We previously tried Trazadone for sleep, but it wasn't helpful.

Good luck
Jamie
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I definitely recommend seeing your husband's Parkinson's doctor. Changes in sleeping patterns is an important issue that needs to be addressed by a professional especially if there are signs of dementia and discomfort. I agree that you need to be sure you get enough sleep, too. Having both of you exhausted will become very difficult. God bless you and your husband.
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Have the sleeping pills and anxiety medication been prescribed by his Parkinson's doctor? Have you been talking this over with that doctor? You might ask if that doctor knows of a sleep clinic with a doctor especially knowledgeable about Parkinson's.

Parkinson's Disease with Dementia and Lewy Body Dementia (which my husband had) both have sleep disturbances as characteristic symptoms. You might not be far off in seeing this as "night dementia." Has your husband exhibited other dementia-like symptom lately? According to the ALZ website, "An estimated 50 to 80 percent of those with Parkinson's eventually experience dementia as their disease progresses. The average time from onset of Parkinson's to developing dementia is about 10 years." I think this is a good topic to discuss with his specialist.

I agree with polarbear that YOU absolutely must get adequate sleep. When my husband's neurologist asked what symptom we wanted help with first, sleep was it! A zombie caring for a demented person is not a safe situation. The doctor consulted with a sleep psychiatrist and they agreed on a treatment plan that worked 9+ years.

Is your husband safe while he is rearranging pillows and pacing the floor? If so, sleep in a different room. Since my husband had other dementia symptoms he could not be left alone overnight. If yours can, take advantage of it! Other options would be having a night aide stay in his room or just outside the room to help him. But it will be best if you can get some medical help to address the issue.
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Until you can find a solution for your husband's sleep problem, i think it' important that YOU get a restful night sleep. You should sleep separate from him so he can't disturb you. No reason both of you have to lose sleep.
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