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I work part time as a caregiver in an assisted living home. I was my father's caregiver and witnessed my mom being a caregiver to my grandma. Was it because of the family history and experience? I don't know, but one day it was just planted on my heart to work for an AL facility as a caregiver.


I'm curious to know what type of complaints family members have of caregivers at the facility your loved one is in? Or, what would you like to see more of from caregivers?


I don't know how long I will be working as a caregiver at this facility, but would like to do my best while I am there.

Ksk I truly wish there were more wonderful people like you in the caregivers field.

The problem isn't with most caregivers as it is with the facility and the management that dont belong where they are and make it very difficult for the caregiver to be effective.

Alot of places are understaffed overwhelmined. Then the younger generation with big dreams of helping get hours and hours when they say enough then they get the bad rap. But ultimately it is the people who need the care that loose out.
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Reply to Wisconsincold78
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Caregiving for a group is very hard work, and in most places there are not enough caregivers so I hope if that becomes a challenge for you that you don't give up because good caregivers make all the difference in a person's well being

don't take anything personally if a resident is harsh or ungrateful -
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Reply to MsMadge
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Ksk, you sound like than a wonderful caregiver. I'm glad you listened to what was planted in your heart. I think you are blessing and inspiring even more people than you know!
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Reply to SnoopyLove
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I think my biggest complaint is not following the Care Plan. The Care Plan is written to help keep her healthy and happy, and if followed sometimes can cut down on their work as well. Example:
Shes supposed to wear a camisole under her tops as she’s always freezing. They are in the drawer I’ve labeled camisoles. About 60% success rate. Then she freezes and they have to get more blanket or clothes for her. I want her socks changed daily, sometimes that doesn’t happen and I have to do it. I want her dentures in for breakfast, so she’ll eat better/faster. Doesn’t always happen and I have have to put them in at 10. I want her in a warm nightgown. Found in the drawer labeled nightgowns. Sometimes I can tell she’s in a NH issued one. Her dietitian has specified decaf drinks. Sometimes I sees she’s drinking regular tea.
So the Care Plan that they all agree to is not always followed, and there is no audit process (other than daily visits from the bitchy daughter) to make sure it happens consistently.

As as far as the caregivers personally, my complaint is that they speak too loudly to her, assuming she’s hard of hearing. She can hear a pin drop, and gets annoyed when she has to tell them not to yell at her. So know your client.
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Reply to rocketjcat
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JoAnn29 Oct 5, 2018
I had them serving her coffee which was a no no. It causes acid reflux and bowel problems.
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I would suggest you taking a seminar for ALZ/Dementia. Our local AL has them. Are you certified (CNA). If not, i would get certified.

Now my complaints. Dressing residents in clothing that doesn't match. Doing hair the best you can. With my Mom, the aides kept changing her part. I wrote notes telling them how to do Moms hair. I even had a special brush to prevent static (she had fine fly away hair) They kept choosing those little plastic bristle brushes that did nothing for her hair.
In the nursing home, I supplied her toothpaste, hair brush and deodorant. The basket was on her side table right nxt to her bed. I even had a note to please use, She was there 5 months. In that time, they never used her toothpaste or brush (kept finding those plastic bristle ones in the drawer) and I had to make sure they weren't using their deodorant. Mom was allergic to deodorants. What I supplied was a special type.

My daughter works in rehab/NH facilities. She tells me, in a perfect world and don't worry about it. For me though, Mom was out of it, at least she could look nice.

I tried to make the aides jobs easier in the AL. I hung Moms tops and slacks together so no problem in matching. I did the laundry so this helped me know when something was missing, too. Her shoes were slip ons.
I made sure she was stocked up on Depends and clean towels. I had a call one day she was out of depends. No, there is a pack in the closet. I used to stack some in a cabinet behind the toilet for the aids convenience. I guess when they ran out the aide didn't bother to look. I had cleaning wipes in same cabinet for quick cleanups. I had found Moms toilet seat soiled as her bath chair. I also had big baby wipes for Mom.

I do think aides are not paid enough. They do all the dirty work. But it did surprise me when a washcloth is left in a sink soiled. Same with the toilet seat and bath chair. In a hurry, yes, forgot to clean up, yes. But what if my Mom went into the bath and tried to wash her face with that washcloth or sat on the toilet. She was out of it so wouldn't have even known what she was doing,

Yes, I am a little OCD. But believe me there are people worse than I am. Mostly out of guilt that they had to place their LO somewhere because for some reason they can't care for them. Then there's those who never visit and when they do they bitch about everything. You will need a thick skin. But it can be rewarding too. So Good Luck.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Lack of communication is my #1 issue at mom's nursing home. Some staff will take the time to try to find answers to my questions or will seek out somebody else who can help, but too often I get told, "I don't know" without any offer to check. I might add I'm not barging in while they are in the middle of something, I try to pick a time when they appear to be available.
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Reply to cwillie
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JoAnn29 Oct 5, 2018
I used notes which they ignored. My daughter warned me.
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