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My mom went from Home Health Care to Hospice (same company) and that was months ago. I don't think my mom is all that close to the end but I have been reading about others whose loved one is nearing the end. Many people said that hospice workers would help in dealing with this. What exactly does the hospice care do when the loved one stops eating and may be nearing the end?

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My father was on hospice when he died, very peacefully, at almost 95. Independently of what they did for him, they were wonderful with my mother. In the weeks before his death, they helped her understand everything that happened, as it was happening, they took care of all the things that had to be done when he died --- official reports, calling the funeral home, and so on --- and they stayed with her and comforted her until she was ready to be alone.
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I chose not to use hospice but continue the normal care process with help from his home health aide when I went to work. While I think hospice can be helpful for patients nearing death from a disease like cancer, I did not see a real role for it for a 90+ yr old who was simply aging with all that that entails. My father was not in pain so administering excessive amounts of pain meds would not have been the correct treatment for him. He continued his normal health meds, and his death came on its own. His mind remained very good right up to the end.
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hospice are comparable to the common housefly in that they eat s**t and bother people. naw, honestly when an elder enters the active phase of dying they invoke family members to administer fatal amounts of morphine and ativan. i think its quite humane but the way hospice distances themselves from the euthenasia leaves much room for question. morphine / ativan liquids = 30 hours till respiratory failure.
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My mom died 2 years ago of cancer, and we got Hospice involved about 3 or 4 months before she did. Dad got a private company instead of the state/county ones that most people got. They were wonderful to mom and were still paid the same way thru Medicare. They first made an assessment of moms mental and physical health, then contacted her doctor about getting whatever medications she might need without ever having dad order them again. They became the go-between mom and her doctor when it came to all decisions, so whatever mom or dad wanted to do, they made it happen. This company was wonderful to my folks, and for the most part I think dad was pretty happy with them. I will say though, you do have to still be your own advocate with Hospice or ANY doctor etc. I think that most doctors & hospice start throwing medications at people that are dying that they don't need. For instance anti-psychotics like Haldol etc. That's what they did to mom which caused hallucinations and all kinds of stuff. Like I say you have to make sure you're ON TOP of what they're giving the person. Mom didn't need Haldol for heavens sake, but they AUTOMATICALLY include that drug in the mix when they start doling out drugs. Pain meds are one thing, this other one was something totally different. Also, if you get a nurse that you don't like and the patient doesn't like, call Hospice and ask for another one. Our first nurse my mom loved, but then they changed her territory and sent us another one who none of us liked. One of us called and told Hospice we wanted our first nurse back, and they did. My mom did stop eating because she said everything tasted the same and gross to her. It was the cancer talking I'm afraid. They make marijuana capsules, brownies, caramels and NOT just the smoke that will help with nausea, pain and bring up the appetite. Tell them you want to try that to see if it helps. Sorry about your mom♥
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