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My father in law recently got a letter from the DMV in PA that they are going to suspend his license because he was diagnosed with early Alzheimer's by a doctor. The good thing is he doesn't feel comfortable driving anymore. My husband and I are new to all of this. What do we need to do? Call his insurance company and take him off his car insurance? We are unsure if we should sell his car or put his car on our insurance and keep it in his garage?

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Sell his car unless you need it. In that case transfer the title to your husband, as they may require your FIL to have insurance if he owns the car and it resides with him. It will also remove the temptation for FIL to feel he can drive.
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Reply to DILKimba
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Don't keep the car unless you think you'll need it for someone else to drive you places. My aunts in FL (98 and 101) have stopped driving and we decided to keep their car because it was easy for them to enter and exit, and had a large trunk for their walkers. I have a relative down there who helps them maintain it, so this arrangement isn't for everyone. Also the older you are the more insurance you'll be paying on it. Otherwise, sell it before it loses too much value and consider using that money towards a pre-paid funeral, which Medicaid permits (up to a certain dollar amount, but way in the several thousands).
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Reply to Geaton777
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If you have the authority to sell the car, do so. A car that just sits deteriorates, and that's not of any value to anyone. Cancel the insurance once it sells.

If you don't have the authority to sell it, at least disconnect the battery to keep from ruining it. If the car any any particular value, you can change the insurance to non-operative status to save a lot of money on the premiums. Call the insurance agent to change it.
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Reply to MJ1929
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When my Grandson's was revoked here in NJ because of epilepsy, the DMV required his physical license be sent back to DMV in Trenton.

When Mom stopped driving, we sold her car. Out of sight, out of mind. If you sell FILs it should be at market value if u think Medicaid will be needed in next 5 yrs (or whatever the criteria is in ur State). If there is still a loan on it, maybe sell it back to the dealer he bought it from.

You probably shouldn't uninsure it till u sell it. The buyer may want to test drive it. Call FILs insurance company and see what they say. There is something about insurance being cheaper if the car is rarely driven. Of course he should be taken off as a driver.

Take the plates (some states plate) off when u sell it. Buyer should have his own plate/s. Then take the plate/s to the DMV and turn it/them in. You will get a receipt.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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The DMV has already deemed your father unable to drive due to suspended sentence. No further action need be done. His insurance on the car will expire, or his POA can cancel it. His car can be sold by your father's POA, and this will remove it from any "forgetfulness" about an ability to drive. Keys should meanwhile be removed. It is too late, if your father is suffering from dementia, to change title or add someone on the title of the car, but it can be sold with the help of the POA. Upon his death the car will become part of his estate at probate.
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Reply to AlvaDeer
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A car you can't drive sitting in the garage would seem to me like a little slap in the face--one more thing you can't do...

My MIL stopped driving about 5 years ago but thought she'd probably take it up again as soon as she was feeling better. Of course, she just continues to decline...and even tho her car sat, unused for all 5 of those years, it also declined. It's worth less than half of what it was worth 5 years ago. I guess she thought she could take the estimate she got 5 years ago ($5K) and it would maintain that value.

Nope, not even close. We tried mightily to sell this car and NOBODY wanted it. Kept in immaculate condition inside and the engine, but with so many dings and scratches on it now, we can't even get people to take it for a test run.

So MIL is angry b/c she won't sell it for less than $5K and nobody will pay that for a 1998 Ford Taurus with a lot of body damage.

DH and his sis should have pushed her harder 5 years ago to get rid of it. Now she doesn't have the mental capacity to fathom selling it.

Just one more thing to do after she passes.
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Reply to Midkid58
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Geaton777 Jan 20, 2021
Midkid58, maybe you've already tried this, but there are sites and apps that will give you the Blue Book value of her car. Showing her it's not worth $5K from multiple other sources may move her needle. I've sold cars for $500 on craigslist. They looked appalling but we maintained them and knew they'd still be a reliable car for short commutes. The people who bought them were really grateful for an affordable vehicle. Maybe appeal to your mom that a struggling student or family could really use her car...?
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Not sure of your fathers age, but the car is an asset as far as Medicaid is concerned.. I wouldn’t hang onto it if your going to need the cash...yes he can have 1 car , but when its sold it’s an asset .use it to enrich his life before Medicaid ...
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Reply to babsjvd
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What’s your FIL’s opinion? If it’s early in the diagnosis he may be able to rationally contribute his thoughts on the car. If he can’t, I’d think it would be a kindness to sell it and not have the constant reminder of what is lost staring right at him. If he wants the car kept, keep in mind his thinking will decline, so take the keys out of the home now
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Reply to Daughterof1930
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