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To start, the veteran would have needed to serve at least one day in a declared war. Correction, 90 days?
The veteran would have needed an honorable discharge, or anything other than a dishonorable discharge.
There are maximum income limits (which are high).


This topic has been covered frequently over the past. Enter veteran's benefits or aid and attendance in the search icon above.
There have been some changes.

Hope you are doing fine today, and can get some funds coming in
to help caregiving your vet! 🇺🇸
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Reply to Sendhelp
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And those are not all the requirements.
(an article here on the forum says this:)
"Wartime Service Requirements:
The veteran must have served at least 90 days of active military, naval or air service, with at least one day taking place during a recognized period of war. The VA recognizes the following wartime periods:
Mexican Border Period: May 9, 1916 – April 5, 1917, for veterans who served in Mexico, on its borders or on adjacent watersWorld War I: April 6, 1917 – November 11, 1918World War II: December 7, 1941 – December 31, 1946Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950 – January 31, 1955Vietnam Era: February 28, 1961 – May 7, 1975, for veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period; otherwise August 5, 1964 – May 7, 1975Gulf War: August 2, 1990, through a future date to be set by law or Presidential Proclamation
(Veterans who entered active duty after September 7, 1980, must have either served 24 months or the full period for which they were called into active duty with at least one day during a wartime period defined above.)
Financial Requirements
Because this pension is intended to supplement the income of financially needy veterans, it makes sense that the VA requires applicants to demonstrate their financial need. Prior to October 18, 2018, the VA only used a household income cap to determine if applicants were eligible for pension and, if so, the amount they were eligible to receive. There was no set maximum amount of assets that an applicant could have, which resulted in claims processors inconsistently and arbitrarily approving and denying applications. To eliminate these inconsistencies, the VA has switched to using an applicant’s net worth to determine financial eligibility.
The VA chose to use Medicaid’s maximum community spouse resource allowance (CSRA) as the new bright-line net worth limit for needs-based benefits like the veterans pension. As of December 1, 2019, the maximum CSRA is $129,094. Like Social Security benefits and the CSRA, a cost-of-living adjustment will be made annually to the VA’s net worth limit to ensure these numbers keep pace with inflation. In order to qualify for a VA pension under the new rules, an applicant’s net worth (assets plus annual income) must be less than or equal to the maximum CSRA.
Certain assets are not included in the VA’s net worth calculation, such as an applicant’s primary residence of any value (regardless of whether they currently live there, in a family member’s home or in a long-term care facility) and an applicant’s personal effects that are “consistent with a reasonable mode of life” (a car, household appliances, furniture, etc.). However, there is a two-acre limit to the size of the lot area upon which an applicant’s primary residence is located. Any additional marketable acreage is considered an asset by the VA.
The VA also enforces a separate annual household income limit. As with assets, certain sources of income are not included in the VA’s calculation. A veteran’s countable income (plus that of any dependents) must be less than a limit set by Congress called the maximum annual pension rate (MAPR).
An applicant’s individual MAPR depends on the type of pension they qualify for, how many dependents they have and whether they are married to a veteran who also qualifies for pension benefits. In 2020, the MAPR for veterans who have no dependents and qualify for the A&A Pension is $22,939, while the MAPR for veterans who have one dependent and qualify for A&A is $27,195. The payment amount a veteran receives is still based on the difference between their MAPR and their household’s annual countable income.
Unreimbursed medical expenses that exceed five percent of the applicant’s current base MAPR can be used to reduce their countable income and net worth. At first glance, an applicant may appear to have excessive income and assets, but if he or she is very ill or requires extensive care, these medical expenses can greatly reduce his or her net worth."
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It’s a lengthy process. Get all of the veteran’s discharge documents in order.
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Reply to Bridger46164
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Each state has different requirements as far as the 'look back' period is concerned, or if there even IS a look back period to determine financial assets. In Colorado in 2014, my father had to have been an active military soldier (with an honorable discharge), have less than $50K (joint between him and my mother) in his asset portfolio if I remember correctly, and require assistance with 2 or more ADLs (activities of daily life). He needed Assisted Living and qualified for it, so he was able to get $2100 a month in Aid and Attendance benefits. I was guided to a State of Colorado Dept of Military & Veterans Affairs (DMVA) State Veterans Service Officer who did all the paperwork FOR me. All I had to do was bring along a list of papers that were required to prove he was in the service, etc. At that time in 2014, they did no look back as Medicaid does to determine if assets were hidden in order to qualify. You will have to contact your local DMVA to see what their requirements are. I went to an Elder Care attorney for free advice and that's how I was guided to the Service Officer who was of immense help to me.

The process was very short..........after I met with the officer, provided the paperwork & she submitted the app, it was less than 1 month later that he was approved & the funds were direct deposited into our joint account (I was his financial POA and federal fiduciary). Now that my father is deceased, my mother gets his survivor benefits in the amount of $1228.00 per month (2020 rates) to be applied towards her monthly rent in the Memory Care ALF where she lives.

Good luck!
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FloridaDD Oct 7, 2020
I am pretty certain that the lookback period is the same no matter what state you live in.   It got changed in 2018.   Your dad was grandfathered.
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Pretty sure that the OP, Waldrich1, did not ask the question so that caregivers would dispute who is wrong, who is right.

Real personal experience counts, as it was true for that person, even if in your State there is a difference in application of the FEDERAL benefit. imo.

It is a Federal benefit for Veterans? I am not sure now.
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FloridaDD Oct 7, 2020
It is a strictly federal benefit, unlike Medicaid which is part federal/part state, so you get different answers in different states.
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https://www.va.gov/pension/aid-attendance-housebound/

Am I eligible for VA Aid and Attendance or Housebound benefits as a Veteran or survivor?
VA Aid and Attendance eligibility
You may be eligible for this benefit if you get a VA pension and you meet at least one of the requirements listed below.
At least one of these must be true:
You need another person to help you perform daily activities, like bathing, feeding, and dressing, or
You have to stay in bed—or spend a large portion of the day in bed—because of illness, or
You are a patient in a nursing home due to the loss of mental or physical abilities related to a disability, or
Your eyesight is limited (even with glasses or contact lenses you have only 5/200 or less in both eyes; or concentric contraction of the visual field to 5 degrees or less)
Housebound benefits eligibility
You may be eligible for this benefit if you get a VA pension and you spend most of your time in your home because of a permanent disability (a disability that doesn’t go away).
Note: You can’t get Aid and Attendance benefits and Housebound benefits at the same time.
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Completely anecdotal story here, but I looked into getting these programs for my father who gets VA disability check each month, and as I recall he didn't qualify because he had not served during active wartime.
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AliBoBali Oct 7, 2020
I probably just muddied the waters unnecessarily here. I don't think VA disability is same as VA pension, so it makes sense that the guidelines given on the website wasn't for his case.

Social workers at VA hospitals are a great resource to ask about specifics for any programs, imo.
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I suggest that you go to your VA County Office and talk to a rep there. You will need your parent's discharge papers. TG Dad left all his service papers in the envelope he was given. He even had the card saying he qualified for benefits. Each situation is different.
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