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Hello !
My father has had PD for 15 years and from far I remembered I have always taken care of him when he has needed it and I have been old enough! Anyway my father is a very loving daddy and grandpa and my two sons love him very much. They are always happy when we go see him or he comes at home.
My father is a very very kind, sweet, patient and calm person with everyone, especially with my children.
They are two and four. Of course they can’t do many things with my dad’s disease and sometimes he suffers of that because he thinks he is not good enough for them... but of course he is!


So my question would what could they do with him and what activities wouldn’t be physical or tiring for him (and maybe a little bit original too ;) !


Thanks a lot for your help!
May

Because your father was a professional pianist, he probably has excellent relative pitch (if not absolute pitch)--and hopedly still has this ability. The kids could play a note on the piano when he isn't watching (assuming you have access to one), and he could amuse them by going to the piano and playing the same note for them They could try to pick a note that he won't be able to find.

I used to have friends do this to see if they could trick me (they couldn't!). For small children, this will seem like a magic trick!
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Reply to jacobsonbob
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Hi there !
Thanks for all your answers ! All the ideas are lovely and the one of the coloring books is my favorite. I am sorry that I am not able to answer to each of you right now. Maybe you know it if you have read my last post in my question « How to soothe and reassure a PD patient ? » but he is at the hospital and he has an aspiration pneumonia related to PD. But I am sure he will be delighted to have all this new ideas as soon as he is able to get out from the hospital, normally in a month. And when I have the time I will answer you !

A huge thanks to all your lovely ideas !
Mary 😊
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Llamalover47 Jun 20, 2021
MaryBX: You're very welcome. Continued best wishes.
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can he read stories to them, can he help them color (if not too shaky), how about looking at picture books, watch them play with their little cars/toys, watch a childrens cartoon show. wishing you luck
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Reply to wolflover451
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Best thing your Dad can do with his little Grands is just to spend time with them.

Reading a story to them or telling them his own stories.

Going through old family pictures.

Coloring, playing music using all kinds of kids instruments, singing, doing puzzles, painting especially face painting where the little ones get to face paint their Grand Pa.

Playing or just watching them play, as kids love having someone watch them do things, even just being silly.

Watching a movie together and eating pop corn.

Setting up little cowboy and Indians or army figure toys, dinosaurs, ect.

Have kid music on and let the kidos do a little jig for Grand Pa.

Having a Pic Nic in the house or back yard.

Prayers
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Reply to bevthegreat
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Anything that doesn't require fine motor skills should work: build towers with blocks and together they knock them down, he tells stories and they act them out, "I Spy" (naming things of various colors, playing with playdough together...
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Reply to Taarna
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Using balls and blocks, even soft ones, in simple activities sounds like a wonderful idea. They would provide both physical and mental stimulation.
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Reply to RedVanAnnie
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Puzzles!!
Telling them stories about himself as a little boy, or his parents’ anecdotes... esp. some naughty things he might have done, like taking a sibling’s toy, &c. Giggling is good
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Reply to Octogenarian
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My young children got involved with Dad’s therapy. They thought they were just having fun with him, but they were helping Dad.

If your Dad is getting any physical or occupational therapy for PD, go along (if this is permissible) or contact his therapists for ideas. Something as simple as rolling a ball or painting pottery (think Jackson Pollock, not Michelangelo) may be helpful for maintaining his motor skills. Simple video games may help your dad as well (I was instructed by a therapist to buy video games for my dad).

Reading, cooking, dancing. Singing songs from his youth.

There are so many “sharing activities” that may bring both generations joy. I’m sure your kids are a welcome distraction from his disease.
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Reply to ACaringDaughter
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knock knock jokes are hysterical at that age. Either between them or with sock puppets!! playing with and making designs in lots of shaving cream (which can have food coloring added) on a table covered by an old sheet (outdoors or inside) is fun and then it is easily wiped / washed away. Having him sing any songs he knows and teach them and video them together. When I was little - I / people / used to … can be wonderful story time the kids might love. Especially if he has any old photo albums.
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Reply to TBIdaughter
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MaryBX: Perhaps the activites could be coloring books or bubble wands.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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*By the way it’s not some activities it’s the (sorry it’s my corrector 😅)
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The block idea is a good one. As I replied to Geaton, my DH and grandson played for hours. When Mom was in an AL, I would take my grandson who was 3 or 4 with me. There was a resident there that liked playing kick ball with him. It was a Nerf type ball and he would kick it to my grandson and he would kick or then throw it back. Maybe they could play pirates. They have nerf swords. Maybe a small pool where Dad can splash them or sit and spray water on them. Bubbles, that's a sit down thing. We would set up a sprinkler and let my grandson play in it and just watch him having fun. I have a video someplace.
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MaryBX Jun 16, 2021
Actually this a really nice idea and thanks for sharing this sweet memory 😉 !
Mary
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Can they play something like dominoes?  (I don't have any contact with youngsters that age so I don't know whether they can understand the dot matching requirements.)

Children I know like to be active, and respond to music.  Perhaps they can make up some dances with Grandpa and frolick, while he remains relatively constant b/c of his PD (depending on how it affects him).   Or perhaps he can just encourage them.
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MaryBX Jun 16, 2021
Hello !
The youngest couldn’t play to the dominoes but I think older one is old enough to understand the game. Actually he can hardly walk so dancing will not be that easy but of course he can encourage them, he already does 😉 !
Thanks,
Mary
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If he is physically able he can connect Duplo blocks with them (they are larger than Legos so easier to handle). Or use the large cardboard blocks (or just regular boxes) and build a wall and then have the "giants" knock down the wall. My boys loved this game.

He can kick a large soft rubber ball back and forth to them while sitting on a chair (or he can be a "goal tender" using a broom).

Some very young kid's board games can be fun and easy, like Don't Wake Daddy, which just has the players pick a card that tells them how many times to press a button. The button controls whether the "sleeping daddy" will spring up out of bed. My kids thought this game was hilarious.

Give them pots and pans and wooden sticks and have them "make music" (or give them actual kid's musical instruments and your dad can be the drummer or conductor).

Etc. It's such a sweet thought to picture them playing together!
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JoAnn29 Jun 16, 2021
That was my thought when I read the post. My grandson and my DH spent hours putting those blocks together. They would make towers and then knock them down. These are great for 2 and 4 year olds. GS and I just cleaned out his corner at my house and at 8 he is not ready to get rid of his blocks.
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My first thought was to have them all color in coloring books together. At 2 and 4 years of age, I'm sure they don't color in the lines yet, so it won't matter if grandpa doesn't color in the lines either(with his shaky hands). They could also all paint together as well, again keeping in mind it's just for fun and not a competition.
Or just have them sit on his lap as he reads them their favorite stories.(the 4 year old can hold the books for him.)
Or even putting simple puzzles together could be fun. Your father could show them where the pieces go, and they could put them in.
I could go on and on, but I think you get the point. At this stage in all their lives, it's just most important that they get to spend time with the grandpa that they love so much, even if it's just sitting on his lap, with him making up silly stories to tell them. Best wishes to you all.
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Reply to funkygrandma59
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MaryBX Jun 16, 2021
Hello !
Thanks for your quick answer ! Indeed I totally get the points in your ideas are very good. In fact he already tell them stories but yes I had never thought about painting or coloring books before ! So thanks for everything and have a nice day !
xxx
Mary
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