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Is jewelry, household items or a payout or loan on a whole life policy on a recoverable asset for estate recovery and what happens if the items were not on the Medicaid application and given as gifts to family?

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Green Stamps were neat. Of course back then there were no phones with apps. Telephones were big, heavy, black and plugged into a special outlet on the wall.
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The green stamps sound kind of neat. I have an app on my phone that if i buy basic things like milk or bread, etc. I get gift cards which is kind of nice.
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Igloo, to clarify the question:

1. During the application process, does the fact there is jewelry and other high value items in the home? And what happens if it is not disclosed on the original application or the value of the items is understated?

2. After the application process is approved, is the person who receives Medicaid allowed to dispose of or give away the assets to family?

3. It is my understanding that after the Medicaid starts, a person must keep their income under 2000 monthly. If a person has to spend down their life policy, can it be given to family members as a gift or does it need to go to a qualified expense?

5. If a spouse dies, do you need to report changes in social security income to dhs?

Thanks
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Tacy - if your ? is about recovery after they have died (as opposed to asset when they are in the application process), if family/heirs are opening probate then within probate will be an "assets of the estate" section that will need to be filed, documented and approved by the court. Within this would be the value of their home or car (which if they are on Medicaid would likely be the only real property owed); the value of a life insurance policy which names the estate as beneficiary; any household good and personal items. If there is jewelry, you list it & its value in this section. For after death recovery, it seems to be the value of the overall "recoverable estate" that makes a difference if recovery is done or if a release of the claim or lien is done instead. How "recoverable estate" is figured varies by state. All states are supposed to do some sort of cost-benefit analysis to have recovery worthwhile in order to attempt.

Some states don't deal with estates under 100K, others go after all estates.
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Yes, S&H green stamp redemption stores... that brings back memories... and those Green Stamps were really a big thing back in the 1960's. Even gas stations had those stamps, you buy gas, get stamps, and maybe a few drinking glasses :)
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Back in the day, grocery stores gave out little stamps that represented some percentage of your purchase that you pasted into a book. Each competed book could be redeemed for stuff like jewelry, books, furniture and the like. The brand/store I remember best was S and H.
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Thanks Pam. What are green stamps?
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Rules vary a LOT from state to state. I will say even NY allows wedding rings to be exempt and handed down. Whole Life policies have cash value and are Medicaid may insist they are part of spend down. A loan to a relative will stand, but Medicaid will insist on a payback schedule with prevailing interest. A payout--to anyone else is a gift penalty.
Household items are best liquidated by an Estate Sale. Our mom did not have anything valuable. She got her furniture with Green Stamps. Honest.
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