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I forgot to add that he was told that it was time for his shower and was not given any other option. He always felt better after his shower, though, so I know he was glad he had one.
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My father was resistant to bathing. We were get it toasty warm in the house and get the shower the right temperature. There would be a big towel waiting for him when he got out. My mother stayed in the bathroom with him until he was finished showering. The shower was walk-in that had a hand-held nozzle and seat, so it was not too bad on him after he got in the shower.
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Go to youtube and search for "Teepa Snow bath". She is a dementia educator who teaches professional caregiver all over the nation how to work with resistant and combative patients.

You basically have to learn how to not say whatever words trigger the meltdown. Just say "time to take off your blouse now Dorothy". Or to even get them into the shower fully clothed and just get them completely wet that way. It may be easier to get them disrobed once wet.

Pam's right - the room has to be very hot (to you). Brightly lit, not noisy. Your patient needs to feel safe in there, so be aware of things that could be disruptive like echos, cold tile, poor lighting.
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Well if you want me in the shower, get the room good and steamy hot, have warm towels and a warm robe at the ready. Spray some lavender and lilac around. Have Sam Elliott apply the warm body oil... oops got carried away.
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