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My mother has dementia, I am so far,able to keep her in her home with 3 shifts of caregivers. VA has kicked in with aid and attendance. She spends a lot of time in recliner and sometimes has a problem pushing herself up to get out of chair. Any ideas on lift chair financial assistance.

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VA handbook 1173.08 page 4 section I.......i. Seat Lift Mechanisms. Seat lift mechanisms need to be considered for patients who are
unable to achieve the standing position when seated in a conventional height seat, when the
patients have the ability to ambulate independently in a safe manner once in the standing
position (refer to PCM Clinical Practice Recommendations for Prescription of Seat Lift
Mechanisms found at: http://vaww1.va.gov/prosthetics/. NOTE: Lift chairs may not be
provided. May not does not mean WILL not
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my husband had a stroke 2 years ago and have a hard time getting up of the sofa will the va pay for the chair
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I am pretty sure that using the VA Aid and Attendance $ for this would be an acceptable purchase. They just deposit the $ into the person's account to spend as needed. I believe they can audit at any time- so better be honest -but this purchase seems like it is something that makes sense.
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Who did you go through to get your VA Aid and Attendance?
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DBell,

If you haven't done so, please make an appointment with a hospice agency for an evaluation for your Mom. Hospice is not just for end of life, and if your Mom has been diagnosed with dementia she most likely would be a candidate for care, especially if she needs caregiving around the clock. It wouldn't hurt to at least find out. And hospice, which is paid through Medicare, covers a whole variety of durable medical equipment.
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my husband keeps sliding from his wheelcahir practically under the table what kind of cushion should i get he has parkinson and dementia
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I just received my new motorized chair in my living room. It's wonderful! It lifts me up and sits me down. It blends in with my other furniture, and it is a petitie size ( am I that). Only $300.00 will be paid by Medicare and the remainder is mine to pay. I haven't filed the paperwork yet, but shall do so, asap. I recommend this addition to anyone's home who needs "a lift".
Now a stair-lift is a different matter. It is considered a "home improvement" and is not paid for by Medicare. It requires a county permit, and is also considered a permanent installation even though you have may it removed at a later time. I've been told that the cost of a stair-lift is approximately $4,000.00. Electrical outlets must be in place inthe correct position and enough room on the stairway is also required. This is not my choice. I'll probably seek an alternative living arrangement as I age.
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Find the local dept of veterans affair in your area
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Medicare will only pay for the lift mechanism on the lift chair, not the chair part. This is usually under $100.
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I believe that VA pay for support services from home care aides (for long term care needs), skilled care, home health care coverage, and if you are eligible for aid and attendance or housebound pension, VA pays family members who provided you with care to medical equipment if they are medically necessary for the rehabilitation and therapy including invalid lifts...
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our local rural king sells one for about 6 hundred bucks. strange place to get one but the price is good. 'spect RK online would hook you up if theyre not in your area.
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I spoke to a provider today. I was told Medicare will only pay for the motor portion of a lift chair, about $300 towards the $1,000 plus cost of the chair. And that's only if Medicare has not already paid for other equipment of a type that would disqualify you from receiving a lift chair. Not sure what that means,but your provider will know. Doctor has to write a prescription and fill out a Certificate of medical necessity. One suggestion,try to find a provider who allows you to rent a chair by the month. That way you can see if you like it. The provider I spoke to allows rentals,with the rental fee applied towards the price of the chair should you decide to purchase it. As for the VA, we asked for a lift chair and were told VA does not provide them. Instead they gave us portable cushion lift you can use on any chair. Sounds good but is virtually useless since it is so hard and uncomfortable to sit on for any length of time.
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Our PT and OP advised against a lift chair for my husband who has parkinson's. My husband slides out of the chair regularly because with his mild pd dementia, he forgets how to use the chair safely. Medicare did pay for the motor for the chair as Tardis said, not the rest of the chair. Also be careful of the type of material on the chair to make sure it is not a slippery finish. Ours is micro plush and acts just like a slide.
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When my father needed a lift chair after a stroke, Medicare paid part of the cost. The vendor had to provide paperwork showing what part of the chair price was for the mechanism. It was basically the cost minus what the cost would be for a comparable recliner. This was about 10 years ago, so the rules could be different now.
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the VA paid for a gel cushion...solved the problem. An OT came to the house...we also have a ramp and rails in the bathroom. Your VA should have a HOME BASED PRIMARY CARE TEAM . Ask for it.
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No, the VA will not. The VA itself will pay for the MOTOR to one, but they will not pay for the CHAIR the motor goes with! Absolute ridiculousness, but this is what I was told by 3 different vendors, my dad's local VA clinic AND the social worker at the VA hospital in Augusta, GA. My father (Vietnam veteran, AO/serivce connected disabled) had his left leg amputated below the knee, and his right foot amputated mid-arch, and they were not willing to provide anything other than a manual wheelchair and a walker. We had to fight to get a motorized wheelchair for him.

Contact your local office, ask for the social worker. They may be willing to work something out, but it's pretty doubtful for that. Medicare is no better, they aren't willing to pay for any of it at all, according to a local vendor (as of June '13).
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I used to work in a pharmacy that also handled some types of durable medical equipment. Your best bet is to contact a lift chair provider in your area as they are familiar with the regulations, but basically your mother needs a prescription from her physician indicating a specific medical condition such as a severe arthritis that prevents her from getting up from any chair in her home. In addition, she must be otherwise ambulatory. If she requires a wheelchair, for instance, she would not qualify for a lift chair. Do check out some of the big box stores like Sam's Club and compare prices with what the durable medical equipment stores charge---you may want to purchase a chair yourself.
BTW, there are some other products, depending on you mother's needs that might help her. dynamic-living/product/lifting-seat-cushions/#clear or dynamic-living/product/couchcane/#clear are less expensive alternatives that she might find useful.
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If she is receiving VA Aid and Attendance pension, part of those funds are for her DMEs (durable medical equipment). Have the doctor write a prescription for such a device, and check into Medicare also about covering such a device. If she is sitting longer than an hour, she should be getting up and stretches those muscles with aide help, and getting her circulation going. I realize in the later stages of dementia the muscles atrophy and soon she will be very stiff when systems start shutting down. Keep her as active as possible. Best wishes!
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Often with a doctors order or prescription medicare will pay for things like durable medical equipment. The VA may be able to help or even give you one. I would sure check. They gave my Father a wheelchair.
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A doctor's order is required for VA durable equipment so her doctor (VA medical team) might be a good place to start although they don't actually arrange delivery themselves. They will either contact her caseworker or direct you to the right person who can answer your questions and fill her needs. I'm not sure a lift chair is considered medical equipment, but they will be able to answer your question and you will need to go through them anyway to get it, if available.
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