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I think my understanding of this issue starts with this. This type of issue goes better when you have attorney representation at the proceeding. Also, a background check is typically done anyway, and if you are a family member of the elder. As for other scenarios, guardians, as I understand are appointed by people who are not family, some court-appointed, others who have experience. I would suspect they have to perform the same type of background check anyway. This is a legal issue and the court handles it legally to determine viable candidates available for guardianship.

I would just mention that I think there may be scenarios where people do this alone without an attorney, maybe, even like in a divorce request, for example. Not knowing the paperwork, not understanding what is required when applying for it can delay your approval. Therefore, this is a question you would ask an attorney. Just feedback. Good question.
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