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My mother passed away and that left my uncle in charge but because we have live a lifestyle he disagrees with he won't let us see her. I also feel he will try to keep us from getting anything when she passes. He is a important person in our community and state, is involved in politics, is educated and financially well off.... I am a convicted felon with a past drug problem. Should that mean I shouldn't be able to see my grandmother or have a right to what was going to be left to me from my grandparents; and not only that I want to help, with her care or anything else I can. It is the least I can do after all I put my Grandmother through. Any advise, what are my rights, or how do I find out myself what they are. I have no money for a attorney.

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Supervised visits, a live skype visit online-if grandma agrees? Hoping you get your family needs restored and met, because it sounds like you too have been through a lot. Keep trying without making demands.
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Lets talk about rights.
To be gentle and kind, I am all for the gradual rehabilitation and restoration of a convicted felon's rights. Often, these rights lost are by law, sometimes federal law. They may be loss of the right to vote; loss of parental rights, loss of the right to carry a gun. While a tragedy for you personally, and for your family too, you can, with the right attitude, regain these rights.
As a fiduciary for your grandmother, your Uncle would be remiss if he was not careful giving access to your grandmother. However! After all you put her through, you may have to prove you are trustworthy now and this can be done!

You say that your Uncle does not approve of your lifestyle, your screen name identity is sixkillerproud, and you are concerned about an inheritance.

If you want a relationship with Grandma, if you want to help, continue to turn your life around, get your life on track. You may have to prove your sincerity by actions instead of demanding rights. So sorry you are going through this difficult time. You can write to her. And yes, it is sad, but just for now. Time will pass, but a lifestyle change may be in order that agrees with Grandma's welfare. Not knowing what that lifestyle is, what does sixkillerproud mean?
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Just want to disagree about grandchildren in wills. My mothers will says in the event my bothers or I proceed her in death our own children will inherit what would have been our portion of the estate. The OP did say her mother had passed on so perhaps grandmas will is like my mothers. Regardless - when my fathers mother passed most of her estate went to her four sons, however grandma did single out her three granddaughters and one granddaughter-in-law for specific items. Before reading the replies in this post it never occurred to me that it might be unusual for grandchildren to inherit - definately has not been my experience.
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How long has it been since you saw your Grandma? Why is the time the right time now and not sooner?
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Take a step in the right direction by sending her a Valentine's Day card. Forget inheritance, usually grandchildren are not in the Will, the children are.
Once you can accept that, without anger, ask your Social Worker to arrange a brief supervised visitation. Keep going to your AA meetings and talk about this with someone in the same boat.
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sixkillerpride, on your profile you don't mention your Grandmother's medical history, would you be able to call and talk to her just to chat to see how she is doing? Have you and your sister been sending her greeting cards? No matter what is the physical issue with your Grandmother or even if she is doing well, people love to get greeting cards.

Also, curious why your Grandmother's son won't allow your sister to visit.

Usually the grandparent's children get the estate, not the grandchildren. The only way you and your sister would get anything from your Grandmother's estate is if she had named you both in her Will. None of my cousins nor myself on my Dad's side of the family got anything when our grandparents had passed.
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It's unfortunate, but from the way you describe the situation it does sound more as if your uncle has concerns about your grandmother's being taken advantage of were he to agree to your visiting her - and he'd have a point.

I recommend you focus on your grandmother's interests. Those would include her right to see her grandchildren if she wishes to. Does she want to see you, especially?
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If you had not mentioned anything about an inheritance, I would have been more sympathetic about your situation. Perhaps your uncle might be willing to supervised visits. Are you living a clean and sober life now? If so, how long? Your uncle is only trying to protect your grandmother's best interests. Have you proven your trust worthiness lately to your uncle?
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The problem for me with your post is you mention twice what you will get from her when she passes before you mention her care. You state you have a lifestyle they dont agree with and past drug problems. If you want to see your grandmother, maybe you could take a drug test, show it to your uncle and prove the past is behind you. Ask for supervised visits and prove your intentions.
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