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As mentioned, my uncle and his wife have taken my grandma and are paying one of their acquaintances to take care of her. There was a family argument before moving her, which is why they refuse to answer calls or tell us where she is so we can at least visit her. My grandma wanted to see her daughter, who came from all the India to see her, but it is not happening because my uncle's wife is not permitting it. Please let me know what action (legal?) I can take so we can visit her. Thanks!

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If your uncle and his wife are preventing your grandmother from having contact with her children, it's a safeguarding issue. They are isolating her, and denying her access to her family. Contact APS and take their advice; but you may need to get a lawyer to write to your uncle and spell out *your grandmother's* rights. NB your grandmother's rights, not your aunt's or yours or anyone else's. It's your grandmother who has a right to have her contact with her family supported.
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The thing is, the son who's currently in charge of her did not want to be fully responsible for her because as she is growing older it is becoming harder for to take care of her. Previously, him and his wife had no issues with letting her stay in their house because she was able-bodied and brought in government money that they could use.

And she does have healthcare as she immigrated here decades ago. Finances, fortunately, aren't an issue at the moment. It's just difficult when she's practically being forcefully cut off by someone who has no right to do so.
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I am surprised that Grandmother's son hasn't had his Mother get a Power of Attorney. If he can pay for a caregiver, he can afford to have a POA put into place... that is if your Grandmother has a clear mind. It is up to Grandmother to appoint someone to take care of her finances and make medical decisions when the time come when she is unable to do so. Usually it is the son who takes care of this, according to my best friend who is from India.

It Grandmother doesn't have a Power of Attorney, that tells me she doesn't have a Will, either. Both are highly important. Otherwise the family will continue to argue over Grandmother's care and any finances she should have.

Just curious, has Grandmother lived here in the States for a long time, or did she recently come?  If it was recently, then she needs to get some type of health insurance.  She can't get Medicare because she didn't put money into Medicare through payroll deductions.  She could get Medicaid, but in the mean time check with Kaiser for health insurance, the family will need to chip in the best they can. 
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She was living with my other aunt, and then she came to stay with us for about a month before my uncle took her. Because she was staying with us, I know that she really wanted to see her daughter since she told us. And unfortunately, I don't think anyone has the power of attorney. None of my relatives would be willing to invest in one (including my own family, as we're not very well off).
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Bravery, where was your Grandmother living prior to her son bringing her to live in his household? I assume she is living with her son, since a friend is being paid to be her caregiver.

Since you and the rest of the family are unable to communicate with the son nor his wife, curious how you knew that your Grandmother wanted to see her own daughter?

If everyone lives in the States, who has Power of Attorney for Grandmother? If no one does, then another son or daughter could start Court proceedings to gain full control over your Grandmother, which is very expensive.

Someone needs to bite the bullet and say they were sorry regarding the big argument. The family really needs to work as a team for the respect of the Grandmother.
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