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My father in law gave his oldest daughter the power to handle his investments when he can't make that decision anymore. He wants me to handle his checking and saving accounts. He's putting me as poa of that. If she is making bad decisions on his investments can I override her?

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I think it all depends on the family dynamics, or relation between the professionals, if the proxies are outside the family. My sister had a strong medical background, I had the legal background. We were co-proxies, acting independently of each other. And since we got along well, our decisions were made jointly in conjunction with each other's guidance.

It is unfortunate though that sibling relations often prevent cooperation from happening, and it's certainly not the fault of the primary caregiver.
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Shared POA seems like a recipe for disaster to me. I have DPOA, my brother is first runner up - we've never gotten along. Brother and I can't agree on whether it's day or night out - and even though he has no official power he still tries to bully me into making decisions in accordance to his superior intellect. When I disagree with my brother and make the call I think is right he actually throws a tantrum - yelling and name calling. My mom is one of those seniors that has a saying for every occasion - "Too many chefs in the kitchen spoil the soup" comes to mind.
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This does seem unusual, but there could be justification. Does your SIL have expertise in investments? Is she a stockbroker, financial planner? If so, that could be why he gave her that authority.

I think the other question is how the two of you get along and whether you could work side by side if necessary when the investment issues and checking & saving account issues might overlap.

There's another possibility and that's that he just wanted to involved both of you; perhaps he didn't want either of you to feel left out. I think the best thing to do is ask him what his thoughts were when he did this.

There could a conflict though if the DPOAs weren't properly drafted and were those downloadable forms. This kind of specific authority designation needs to be handled properly by an attorney so there's no conflict on down the line.
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My Mom has both my sister and I as POA..

When my Mom was admitted to rehab last year they said they had to adhere to the first name listed, which was my sister..

What a shock for her.. I have been Mom's caregiver for over 14 yrs. My sister rarely visits and has no clue what goes on with my Mom medically or financially..

My sister was happy to step a side and let me make decisions god forbid she takes on that responsibility!!
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Most of the time when someone is made a POA later on that means that the previous person is no longer the POA and should have received some sort of notice about that change.

Did your father in law do that or did he write up a new POA in which his daughter was the main POA and you are second in line if she is not able to do the job? What does the POA document actually say?

If you have a shared POA, then that is a mess. I hope you and his daughter have a good relationship?
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My brother told me a person can only have two poa's. Is that true in Nevada?
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Typically, or the way I am finding that people are doing it with more than one sibling, is having one sibling, along with a non family member that is an accountant or someone that is knowledgeable.

Because, what I read on here, as well as my own family, is that other person, could have saved the sisterhood from being destroyed.

Regardless, remember, if whomever is not making the best of decisions remember as brothers and sisters, of course we will not have the same way of doing things.

Why he did this I do not know.

I thought or I know in our state you should or it is likely that we can have as many POA's as possible but it would be a big MESS.

REGARDLESS, JUST REMEMBER BEING A POA IS NOT AS EASY AS ONE THINKS.

Good luck.'''''
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So he gave her power a year ago. He is now putting me in charge. Does that mean she isn't in charge of his investments?
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No. Why did he split the power that way? It is usually one person that takes care of all financial business, solely tor that reason. One person has to have the complete financial picture.
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