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I care for my disabled mentally challenged non-ambulatory adult son. He sleep in a hospital bed at home and it is becoming increasingly difficult for me to turn him to dress him and care for him in bed as we both age. He outweighs me and I have seen ads for " turning " sheets which have less friction and allegedly assist a single one person caregiver in turning a patient in bed.
I have an electric hoyer lift which I use to transfer him to & from wheelchair to bed and have seen ads for a " turner sling " that connects to an electric lift nd can assist in turning a patient in bed however...........the sling is manufactured by Pelican Manufacturing in Australia and I'm in US.

Does anyone know here I can get the best possible device/ turner sheet that would assist me as a one person female caregiver in turning my adult son in bed ?

Thanks-NK

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look up tomi-turn or twin turner
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I want to learn how to care for a patient who cannot assist during turning him up in bed
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I want to learn how to turn a heavy patient up in bed .
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Daddyo49. Must have missed this a year ago and i second the advice given above. Do you have any strngth in your arms? If you do you may be able to help your wife by holding your stepson on his side from your W/C. you will be on the side you SS is facing and hold on to the turning sheet to hold him over while she provides the necessary care. There are some good instructional videos on Utube which show how to provide basic nursing care. many caregivers enter their role with no instruction or experience and do the best they can often to the detriment of their own health. This forum is designed to help caregivers of loved ones dementia but frequently physical problems provide the most challenges. please share what progress you have made.
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Shellylynn- I specialize in bed mobility products and would like to know more about the "tri-turner sling" but couldn't find it on the website you mentioned. I like to be aware of new products that I could suggest when people get in touch with me. If it is hiding on their website where do I look? Thanks for your help.
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I know this is over a year late but there is a turner sling in the US through prismmedicalinc it is called a tri-turner sling.
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Thanks - but the patient is severely physically & mentally challenged + is profoundly retarded and is unable to sit themselves up or move their legs or stand and has no grasp in their hands and has juxta-positioned thumbs and is unable to fully unclench fists but I will go to AbleData.com
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In general- please allow a person to "help themselves" as much as possible with whatever assistive products the person can handle. Much better for the person- more independence, comfort, and chance to use muscles. Reducing strain to the caregiver is critical to avoid disaster- especially important as the caregiver ages or if there is a big weight mismatch. AbleData.com has lots of products to check out (although the newer products I see aren't there yet).
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I understand that some foreign companies & distributors carry " side turning " hospital beds which ...unlike the " rotation therapy " hospital beds that only shift patients to prevent decubitus ulcers actually turn patients on their side such as the " Flex-care " bed but I can't find any US " side turning " beds that are sold & distributed by US companies ? -- Does anyone know where I can get a " side turning " hospital bed ?
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I have a hoyer lift but the legs won't spread wide enough for extra wide wheelchair. Anyone else have that problem?
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daddy049..... I can tell you are an awesome person! You are going through extreme hardship and doing what it takes to survive. It angers me the help you need is not readily available to you, and there are those out there who don't need the help yet take advantage of the system. I know nothing of the equipment you need, except the use of a hoyer lift, and a slide board. I have used the pull sheet system( when short staffed), and tucked a pillow behind the back to hold the immobile person over on their side. This is also useful to change the sheets of a bedridden patient, half of the bed at a time. Also tell your wife to bend her knees any time she has to lift to save her back. If I were there I'd help you..... hope you can find the help you need!
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My only issue is that my wife pushes my step-son on his side rather than pulls him on his side and the Turn2 only pulls a patient onto their side
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thanks for info - that does look like it would work well - good luck to your wife and to you all!
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Turn2 Turning Aid 15 X 35
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What is the actual name of the Turn2 product you are talking about? I've tried to look it up on Amazon - I saw Levin lifting strap, but nothing called Turn2!
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It sounds like your wife is a saint.
I know there is supposed to be a hug symbol someplace but I can't find it.
I send hugs to all of you.
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I ordered it in Amazon because it was cheaper and the shipping was much cheaper. I spoke to a very helpful woman at Turn2 who actually suggested I get the smaller size since by step-son is is under 250 lbs and the smaller turner is shorter and does not interfere with hygienic cleansing of patient as longer one would on patient less than 250 lbs
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Let us know when you receive the Turn2. I ordered one 8 days ago but it hasn't arrived yet...........not sure what is taking so long but anxious to hear if it helps you.
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My step-son is in an adult day program now in one of the best nursing homes in the area. He is transported there daily and every 6 months he stays in " respite " in the N.H. for 1 week. Medicaid will not pay for " respite " in the N.H. _ adult day program at the same time consequently when he is in " respite " for the week he is not allowed to attend the day program downstairs. He has never had any decubitus ulcers in his life thanks to my wife & the incredible care she renders. I am just trying to ease her physical burden now. I have ordered a Turn2 Turning Aid already & will be discussing other turning options ( including beds I've seen ) with his Social Worker. We have an electric hospital bed at home + an electric hoyer lift at home and are doing our utmost to enable my wife & her son to be together as long as possible . Hence our search for a turning bed/ device to make her labor of love less arduous.
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Have you had a home health evaluation lately? The doctor can order it for you. They have therapists that can come into your home to evaluate your situation. They know all about the various equipment that are available and how helpful they may be. They can also evaluate your wife when she is turning your son to make sure she doesn't injure her back.

Frequently, insurances will pay for the service. When I worked for home health, we used to make a visit at no charge to evaluate the situation and let the family know if the services would be covered by insurance, Medicare or Medicaid. This might be a good option for you before you buy the equipment.
Best wishes to all of you.
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My dear fellow, it sounds as if your home is struggling! You don't say your age, but I wonder - I finally had to put my brother into a nursing home at 56, when his balance deteriorated and he could not live alone. I worried about his younger age, but I chose the home well: sitting on flat land so he walks with his walker to nearby church, and he is also transported to a brain injury program 4 days a week. He has felt stable with these supports on Medicaid. Your situation is different but you might look at nursing homes within easy travel for you and your wife, and at the same time, since he would be younger, find a day program he might attend a few days a week. It takes time and is not easy, but in the end, it is much better than me struggling to give inadequate care.
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Yes and he we have a home hospital bed + an electric hoyer lift. I pay for United Health Care Insurance in addition to which he has Medicaid + Medicare. I usually say he has 3 million dollars worth of insurance + 4 million dollars worth of medical issues. He has CP, is profoundly mentally challenged, he is completely non-ambulatory and he has hydrocephalus. I doubt that insurance with pay more than little, if anything, toward automatic turning beds such as Flex-care bed or Vendlet bed but I am willing to purchase one of these beds if they will enable my wife to turn my step-son automatically in bed which is why I was hoping to find someone who had used these beds either in a hospital setting or at home ?
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We have a dual problem in that an injury has left me wheelchair bound with limited ambulation so I can't assist my wife who is the Caregiver. My adult step-son is severely mentally challenged as well as being severely disabled and is thus unable to assist my wife in turning him. We have an electric Hoyer Lift at home as I indicated however t I just found out about Flex-care Beds & Vendlet Beds . They are both automatic turning & sliding beds and I was considering purchasing one and was wondering if anyone had any experiences ( pro or con ) with these or other automatic turning/sliding beds ?
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Is your son receiving assistance from your state department of economic security? He sounds like a perfect candidate. I know that our state's DES helps provide equipment and aide assistance to our disabled young people, especially if the disability is congenital.
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I also use a draw sheet to turn my mom. Before I turn her I make sure her arm will not be underneath her body when I turn her and I place a small pillow between her legs and try to scissor them as I turn her. The top leg will help keep her from rolling back over if it is in front when I get her onto her side. It seems like every time we go to the hospital, we learn new tricks from the nurses and aides on moving her around without as much trouble.
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Have you tried the washable incontinent pads? They come in different sizes depending on the patients needs. I use these for my mom and they are strong, but she can help grab the rails. I roll it and pull her with it. Please post the turn sling and let us know how it works for you! I am under 120lbs and it can be difficult so I can only imagine what you are dealing with everyday. Wish you all the best!
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Note to NK, Daddy49 - in case you don't know about using the ordinary sheet, folded - you put that on the bed (under where the heaviest parts of his body will lie) before your son is in the bed. And as I said, I put those slippery blue moisture disposable ones, with slippery side up, under the flat sheet when you put that on. So your son is lying on top of something flat underneath him, that is ready to pull easily, when you need to turn him. You can master this task if you experiment! Good luck!
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Does he help you when turning or does he resist? My very overweight MIL resists the turn which makes it so difficult for one person. Look on line for a turn2. I ordered one but it hasn't arrived yet. It might really help you and me both :)
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Hi. I'm a small person and work in home health care, so I can relate to your question. I agree about using an ordinary flat sheet - and I for added slipperiness underneath, I put a few of those blue slippery pads that they use as disposable moisture barriers - but I put them the under the sliding sheet, the wrong way up, since I'm not using them for moisture barriers then, but to add slipperiness. And, it is a lot easier to turn someone when the bed is not soft, and does not sink down so much in the middle. Maybe a different mattress on the hospital bed, or some form of board thing (like they put under sagging sofa seats) underneath the mattress. I also used some kind of wedge, even rolled pillows to slide under the person when I had them part way rolled over, so I could rest and adjust my angle for the next part. You probably do that already. I like to use the light blue cloth pads they sell for moisture barriers - they are strong enough, come in many sizes, often slippery on the blue side. Also work with your son so that he will grab the bars on each side to help you - good to give him something to learn and help. Finally, with today's internet, look up hoists and slings. You’d think you might be able to hook up a different shaped sling to your Hoyer lift. Copy the design of the bed lift sling, get someone to sew you a new version. Maybe ask if the company in Australia can send you one of their electric lift turners, or ask their managers if they have any American contact companies. Keep asking - look for people with a similar problem, and ask anyone and look at options. You have an important problem, and a challenge in taking care of your son – best of luck! Keep coming back to share questions!
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You don't need any "special" sheet. Just take a flat sheet, fold it over twice, then place it underneath your son. When it is time to turn him, roll up one side and as you are rolling, pull toward yourself and lift up so the sheet does the turning. He can help by holding onto the side of the bed or get a bed with side rails which will help too. Since it is becoming more difficult for you, I also suggest you check into finding needed help. God bless you for caring for him!
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