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All she did is hit me and wouldn't cooperate with me. What should I do ?

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If keeping a dementia patient clean becomes an international issue, it is not the fault of the patient; it is the fault of the caregiver. The way I do with my husband, as previously commented on, is easy as rolling off a log.
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It may be the 'tub' issue; stepping over can be a mighty obstacle to someone unsteady: fear of slipping getting in or out, or while in the tub.

Perhaps:

Walkin bathtubs are quite nice but of course means some bath remodeling

A walk-in shower with plenty of handrails and good shower chair, with water temp already adjusted....

and non slippery areas out of the bathing area
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Is there a law that a person with dementia has to take a shower? I never give my husband a shower or immerse him in a bath anymore. I sponge bathe his torso one day and his legs and feet the second day, along with a pedicure, and he keeps his privates washed every day. No muss, no fuss. Then on the third day I shampoo his hair at the sink. Voila! Over and done with until next time, which is three weeks later. So long as his privates are squeaky clean, the rest of him can go three weeks until I start the easy cycle all over again.
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Going very slowly, giving the person part of her own cleaning job, even if it doesn't satisfy you, let her do it. Being respectful of her privacy. Put yourself in her place, even if she has dementia. Sometimes humor helped with my mom. I feel for you!
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She may not be "stubborn", there may be something about a shower that scares her or that she's uncomfortable with.
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When you say you "have an 80 year old lady" - what does that mean? Is this a relative or a client?

Unless it is your job, one way or another, to persuade this lady to bathe, perhaps you'd better leave her alone. I'm slightly anxious about what the "everything to try to get her into the shower" involved.
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Bathing can be a horrible experience for elderly /dementia patients.
First of all make sure the bathroom is warm, perhaps light a nice smelling candle and if you can put some soothing music on near by that helps too.
Bubble bath etc.
If she is able to get in and out of a bath then that is probably more relaxing and calming than the sensation of a shower.
They are my tips.
My mother loves to have a bath now because we have turned it into a relaxing treat.
Give her space once she is in, don't stand over her..perhaps give her 10 mins alone to lie back and soap herself and then come in and help her do the rest and get out and dry.
Good luck.
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Call in the Occupational Therapist, her doctor can order one. OR give her a warm massaging bed bath, one small area at a time. Also, go on youtube and watch the Teepa Snow video about bathing.
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