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Perhaps you should browse through the sports store or toy department looking for simple noise makers, I bet once your loved one starts blasting an air horn or cow bell to get attention they would come up with a better solution. LOL
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LTCO, is it her COGNITIVE limitations or physical issues that are causing the issue?

If she cannot physically work the button, then according to ADA rules, they must figure out a work around that works for HER. You may need to get the long term care ombudsman in her state involved.

If it's her COGNITIVE issues that are interfering, it may be that she needs a higher level of care. Let us know how contacting the ombudsman works for you. We learn from each other here.
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Pretty sure zytrhr is just the banned Nasir...since he/she offers the same ignorant, uneducated, unhelpful, rude answers on every post.

Angel
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I tell my mom to use the call button and she looks at me like I have two heads. I show her and she doesn't understand.
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Thank you for your responses and I agree with all. Unfortunately the LTC facility feels that the current system works and no need to explore other options. I did an online search for call light button adaptors but found nothing. How can that be?
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She'll probably have to wait until the nurses make their rounds, unless she can yell when she needs help.
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I would think they should have some kind of pull cord alarms available such as you see in washrooms and in hospital. At the very least they could modify something with their fall alert systems if they put their minds to it.
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Is her difficulty pushing the call button due to physical limitations in her hand OR does she have cognitive decline that renders her unable to realize what the button is for?
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I think that the LTC facility had better come up with a reasonable accommodation to that resident's limitations! Surely this is not the only resident they have with such difficulties. Do they just ignore this need?
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