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My husband has Capgrass type dementia. He still recognizes a lot of his surroundings however not usually me his wife. He is difficult with me and I'm realizing it's getting closer to moving him to a care facility since his disease is causing health issues for me due to stress. I've found a private home but I struggle with how to make this move. Any suggestions?

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I'm ready to move him, only because he's difficult to manage, as far as ideas he gets in his head that are very hard to deal with. He wants to go home, but he's home, he thinks the neighbors are doing things to our yard, he's blind in one eye and he has limited sight in the other and he wants to drive. I realize I can take the keys and I have but that too causes issues . And of course he doesn't think there is anything wrong with him, every one else is to blame. So having him take an active part of my decision is not a choice I have. I may have the caregiver from the home that I have chosen come by and meet him here in our home a few times. Like I said I'm ready to move him but it's very heartbreaking and a very difficult decision to make.
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Very good idea to get him used to the new surroundings, I agree; and the home's managers may have some useful ideas, too. They may even have preferences about getting him ready so that he'll settle in nicely, come to think of it. Why not give them a call?

Are you going to be all right when the time does come? Everybody on this forum knows that the decision is never, never easy and will be very supportive if you want to talk.
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When it came time that my Dad wanted to move to senior living as he could no longer keep up his large home, plus his memory was starting to slip. We picked out a senior facility that he liked, and his new apartment would be ready in a few weeks as it was being remodeled.

So in the mean time, I or Dad's caregiver would take Dad to the facility for its social hour, so he could start getting familiar with the place and to meet some of the people. Thus, when it was time for Dad to move in, he felt right at home.

Now I realize this won't work for everyone, as with dementia each case is different.

Now, my Dad did have his own private caregivers while he lived at home, and we decided to keep the morning caregivers once he moved. The caregivers helped Dad pack and helped him move in his own furniture, etc. And the caregiver was there every morning when Dad woke up, thus a familiar face, plus routine.
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