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I have power of attorney over my wife in all matters.

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If your wife is still able to make decisions, you just need new papers drawn up for her to sign. If she is not able, you will need something from her doctor stating that, then your power of attorney will be in force. You should be able to have your daughter named as a second to yourself in case you become incapacitated or injured. You need a medical power of attorney and a financial power of attorney. If you have your daughter in charge, you need to have some sort of checks and balances so she cannot take all your money and leave you destitute. I have seen this happen, just as the Devil tempted Adam, large amounts, even small amounts of money can tempt people. A good way to correct that is to have her required to report to your lawyer or a banker every 3 months with a statement of what your money is being spent on, etc. An elderly lawyer should be able to help you with all these things. If you cannot afford a lawyer, there are legal aid persons that will help you for free. Just google legal aid and a group near you should pop up.
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I would be very wary of anyone having access to my money, this is usually where specifically young people are tempted and you know where that goes, need I say more? Too many times the very people who end up taking advantage of you are your own relatives including children. People start off meaning well only for mistakes to be made or temptation where lots of money and assets are involved. Look at the opportunities when you see that bank account or that house or car, see what I mean? I personally would never want a POA, my bills are set from my end up to come out automatically so my bills are paid if something happens to me. If I were to become long-term incapacitated, I wouldn't want no one touching my money because I would hate to wake up one day and everything was changed into something it wasn't before. I would hate to wake up broke, my bills not being paid or maybe I lost my home. I would want my bills still coming out so that I can just come home and back to my normal life as I knew it before. 

Never ever ever give anyone access to your bank account, and I'm speaking from my own experience of dealing with my dad's estate where there was a faulty POA with a shady past. I strongly encourage you to please learn from what has happened to others and learn from others who are already practicing prevention to keep others from taking advantage of them, and I have an awful lot to say about it because no one's taking advantage of me
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To do this you would need a attorney, their ones where I live that do this kind of work for free. Check with your stare Representative or Senator.
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Greets Rebecca
Yes it does it is a springing power of attorney in para 2 (YES & YES)
para 3 yes as well we had to do ours more like a business due to the fact that we got some out law family members we had do disinheiret so Mr C made it a bit more litigation proof. Also we named one of my other attorneys as a last successors to the entire document it was his choice. so it is lined up like this
1st Mom

2nd Myself
3rd my current wife
4th my attorney

Rebecca in regards to your last paragraph,  we have done this now for the third time just to get it right,  because there is alot to this and in the beginning mom was not too well versed so she had her granddaughter help her well that is one of the ones we caught embezzling from the special needs portion of this trust.  That is when myself mom my 2 attorneys and my current other half and moms friend all sat down together and hashed over this we do finally have it spot on or at least very very close...

let me pose a question to anyone here that may know the answer,  lets say in a Living trust it names john doe as a primary sucessor can that john doe use that trust as an instrument of negotiation for lets say buying stocks under the assumption john doe has a 40% share of the trust gauranteed to him??  I have heard so many people talking about this particular issue happening and if it    can I think one of the outlaw family members may have done this at one time.
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As a legal professional who deals with several POAs a day for business units for life/annuity copmany, I don't think there's quite enough information here to give a fair answer.

First, does your POA name a successor agent if you are not willing or able to be the agent for your wife? Does it provide you the authority to name a successor agent? It will be specific language within your wife's POA.

If it does provide a successor agent/attorney-in-fact or allows you to name a successor POA, you can resign in favor of that named successor agent. Keep that resignation with the POA, as companies like mine need to see why the primary agent isn't acting.

If it does not, there's where your issues may arise. If your wife has capacity to do so, you could have a new POA executed. Otherwise, you may need to consult with an elder law attorney as to your options.

And as mentioned, it may be a good time to review your own POA to make sure it covers successor POAs and have a new POA drafted if it may not meet your own needs.

Best wishes.
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YOU NEED TO CALL YOUR ATTORNEY IF YOU DO NOT HAVE ONE I CAN RECOMMEND ONE IF YOUR IN THE LONG BEACH CALIFORNIA AREA

KEEP IN MIND CHANGES LIKE THIS OFTEN REQUIRE REWRITING THE ENTIRE TRUST IF YOU HAVE ONE,  YOU MAY WANT TO LOOK OVER THE ENTIRE PACKAGE AND MAKE ANY MORE CHANGES WHILE YOUR DOING THE NAME CHANGE.  TO REWRITE A COMPLETE LIVING TRUST HE CHARGED ME APPROX $2,500.00  JUST TO REMOVE A NAME IS  600.00
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I would try talking to social worker or an attorney about this possible change.
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JT, I agree with GardenArtist above, only your wife can make a change to her Power of Attorney. If she is unable due to advanced Alzheimer's/Dementia, than you would need to remain as her Power of Attorney or have your daughter get Guardianship for her Mom and that can be expensive.

After seeing what is happening now, please look at your own Power of Attorney, is your wife your POA? Or is it your daughter? If it is your wife, time for you to make a change to your own POA. Than that would be one less thing for your daughter to worry about when you become much older.
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JT, I agree with GardenArtist above, only your wife can make a change to her Power of Attorney. If she is unable due to advanced Alzheimer's/Dementia, than you would need to remain as her Power of Attorney or have your daughter get Guardianship for her Mom and that can be expensive.

After seeing what is happening now, please look at your own Power of Attorney, is your wife your POA? Or is it your daughter? If it is your wife, time for you to make a change to your own POA. Than that would be one less thing for your daughter to worry about when you become much older.
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JT, you really don't have POA "over" your wife; you have the authority to manage her affairs, as outlined in the POA, on her behalf as granted by her to you. In a sense, you're working for her, with her best interests being the goal.

Since your wife would have executed the POA, she would also be the only one who can change it. A proxy (you) cannot change a POA executed by someone else.

Is your wife no longer capable of changing the document if SHE wants the change to be made?
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