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She tried two commercial tools for one-handed persons but one only worked for right handed people and the other failed entirely.

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JessieBelle-Lasix works but it's hard on the kidneys. My dad has stage 3 kidney disease from having to use diuretics.
But those compression stockings are very hard to use. If they're tight enough to do any good, it's almost impossible to get them on an off. My dad had the best luck with the zipper ones.
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Jessie, your comments on the excessive tightness, the grooves in the skin underneath the stockings, and flesh bulging over the top are part of the reasons I thought I could do a better job by making my own. Even though the stockings do control edema, I've often wondered if they really are safe.

I also found that using an new, fresh ACE bandage can help as well, and it can be wound with more flexibility than the stockings.

I also realized that the stockings are sized. Initially I thought they all came in standard sizes. I didn't notice that they were also sized differently until I compared the first stocking with the second stocking I received from the same podiatrist, about 2 years apart. That's when I realized that there were different sized ones.

But I don't know anyone, regardless of how thin, who can wear those things comfortably. My father is very skininy, but the stockings compress his skin and leave marks, and he has skinny ankles that anyone would envy.

One of the things that might help, if the individual would agree to do it, is to use one of the exercisers that are similar to bike pedals. Therapy departments have them in larger, stronger versions. Either can be used on a table for arm exercise or placed on a floor for leg exercise.

It's not the same as getting up and moving around or doing leg exercises standing up, but it's some exercise done sitting down and involves moving the legs.
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Thanks, send. The bad thing about Lasix is it is hard on the kidneys. What I do is give it to her only when her legs are swollen. I'll give her a whole dose when it is really bad and cut it back to a half pill when it is getting better. I don't give it to her otherwise. Doctors often write a prescription saying to give one pill a day, but we don't have to follow it religiously. My mother's blood/urine work indicated her kidneys were a bit stressed, so I like to give it as little as I can.

I wish she would exercise her legs more. That is the best thing I know for legs that swell. Sitting with the legs down or standing for long stretches are the worst.
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Any treatment or medication or assistive devices come with a warning: The benefit should outweigh the risk.
Listen to Jessebelle, and run it by your Mom's doctor.

Earlier, I was going to say to research the actual benefit of compression stockings. Now that Jesse has weighed in, we know there are other alternatives.
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I use chemical compression -- Lasix -- for my mother when her legs get too swollen. I'm sorry, but those compression stockings are awful for her. The tops look like tourniquets, with flesh bulging from the tops. They leave heavy grooves that make me wonder if they interfere with circulation. They look like they hurt. The problem may be that they don't make them big enough for her.
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I recall years ago when I was rummaging around in my sewing/material/wood/beads/craft and miscellaneous closet upstairs that I found bags of clothing from years ago, including some old girdles. Remember those monstrosities?

I got the idea of making compression stockings from them. They're elastic, not as tight as the compression stockings which I think are far too tight to be realistically usable. I would probably add a zipper, or large swatches of Velcro.

The project is still in the conception stage - it's too much work now to dig out all the stuff I'd have to to find them, but I think it's a reasonable concept. Swimsuit material is also an option; I doubt if there's any in the fabric stores now though
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I was talking to my mother's podiatrist the other day about compression stockings. My mother has an awful time putting on even the largest size. Her legs are always swollen. The podiatrist told us that many people have the same problem, so that compression socks are something they buy, but never wear. I can believe that. Those things are hard to put on!
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Then the zipper ones might be best
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Three occupational therapists and none have had any answers. She can get them on herself, it's removing them that's the problem. Her doc said to remove them when she goes to bed.
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Ooh ooh just found this ...google COMPRESSION STOCKINGS WITH ZIPPERS

that might help
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Eyelash is right You might either have to do this for her or get someone in who can. They are damned difficult to put on someone else with both hands and arms and taking off isn't much easier. If she rolls them down she will never get them over her heels and the compression would be disastrous round her ankles- Why doesn't the person who puts them on take them off? Aren't you supposed wear them all the time - I know Mum had to even if she did hate them. We only took them off for showers etc
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I don't have any suggestions but just wanted to offer my sympathy for this task which can be so difficult. It's hard enough to get compression stockings on with both hands, so one handed must be a real chore.

There is a possibility of using one of the grabber devices, but it's an awkward method at best.

Maybe she could roll them up, starting with a roll around her feet and gradually unroll them?

I agree though that an occupational therapist might be of assistance.
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An occupational therapist might be able to help you. Have your mom's Dr. give you a referral.
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