Follow
Share

If you use a toilet safety product at home (raised toilet seat, toilet safety frame, commode over a toilet), what do you do when visiting family and friends, in a public restroom, or when traveling? Unfortunately, none of these products are portable and discreet, so you can't take them with you. Risk a fall? Stay home? Rely on a diaper? Appreciate feedback.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
We don't get out much anymore, unfortunately, but when we did we visited the restroom constantly, no matter where we were. Mom had a "thing" about toileting. I guess it was a fear, really, of an accident. Thank goodness for handicapped toilets, with the bars. They're not always the best, but at least large enough for me to go in with her to assist. Family restrooms are the best. At people's houses, she would always try to grab the towel rod or the toilet paper bar to support herself and I had to intervene and assist her. Gas station restrooms are the worst usually, so when travelling we would stop at McDonald's (they're everywhere) and I would usually buy a cookie or bottle of water to justify. It is a challenge, for sure. Even before she got to where she couldn't walk at all, we would use a wheelchair when we would get out because she would get so tired. So it was easier to stand in line and wait for the handicapped stall, or to transfer her to the toilet. And she was always in a pullup once she became the least bit incontinent. I would carry the adult version of a diaper bag with gloves, wet wipes, Ziploc bags (for disposal purposes), extra pullups, sometimes even a change of trousers. Eventually, you will be glad you have those items. I would hang a small backpack on the handles of the wheelchair. She's pretty much bedbound these days and I look back fondly at the days when we could go out to eat or travel a little.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Handicapped toilet stalls are available in most public areas and the best option. When visiting you need to plan around bathroom needs, go at a time of day when they are less likely to need to go and wear pads or pull-ups as a backup. They DO make portable toilet extensions that have built in arms for longer visits or when at the home of close friends and family, but I have to admit I have never tried one.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Public restrooms, must have a "handicapped" stall where there are usually bars to hold onto to help one lower and then raise yourself from toilet. When visiting a private home, the best bet is to wear an adult undergarment. I know first hand, as I need to use both myself.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

And a protective undergarment is always nice as a backup in case they don't make it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My mother has a safety frame with a seat on her toilet. She doesn't need anything special when we go out. She takes her rollator in the stall if there is room. She is able to get up and down on her own. I imagine it would be much more difficult if someone had weaker legs or bad knees. If a handicap stall is available, the seat is normally higher and there are bars to pull up. If my mother needed it, I would make sure one of these was available if it was needed.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.