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Guess what? I actually have a question and not a gripe for a change (smile)!


It's been a couple weeks since Dad's "minor" stroke, and for the most part, he seems to be taking things well. We want to start Occupational Therapy, but I won't be able to afford it until the move, and Medicare only covers hospice or OT, and I'd rather keep the hospice.


I've picked up a few things here and there. The OT at the hospital taught me how to dress Dad a little easier by starting with the challenged arm first, then the head, then the other arm.


I've purchased Dad some new pants that look like traditional casual pants but don't have zippers or buttons. There's a "mock fly" so he doesn't feel like he's wearing "old man pants".


Eating has been a little challenging. So far it's been a LOT of sandwiches cut into fours and finger foods. Dad gets frustrated when trying to eat a more traditional meal. It was already challenging enough with his sight, but now that he can't use his left hand to hold bread to push food onto his fork, he's struggling a bit.


I did some online research, but I'm overwhelmed with the amount of adaptive utensils out there. I'm not sure what to get.


So far, my other "must haves" include folding straws, cups with lids (but not the sippy cup looking ones. Dad hates those), and antibacterial hand wipes since Dad has a hard time washing his hands with soap.


Is there a guide or resource out there that would give me some pointers on helping Dad keep as much independence as possible... or a basic shopping list of some sort?

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These "ruggies" (link below) may not get good ratings for keeping rugs from slipping, but are fantastic under a plate, bowl, around a handle of razor, under an arm bike to keep from slipping for one-handed use etc for non-slip. Please look up one-handed ADL for stroke, there are dozens of tips that are free or very cheap! And insist on an OT consult on hospice; it should be available!


Ruggies As Seen On TV Rug Gripper Stopper Rug Pad Ruggy Washable Carpet Pad Floor Gripper Suction Grip Stopper Corner Carpet Holder include 8 adhesive sticker + 8 Rug Pad https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NGCW4BW/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_BR.pBbKQPMAYM
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Reply to rose815
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Go to AARP.org. There is an unbelievable amount of information on there!
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Reply to Llamalover47
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We use wide, shallow soup bowls with enough of a rim to provide an edge to keep food from sliding off. Mom can push the food against the edge of the bowl to get it on the fork.
Plus we use rubbery placemats where dishes don't slide easily. And since they are real dishes without any adaptations, Mom feels like she is still in control and not being treated like a toddler.
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Reply to KellyTheRed
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I've been thru' a lot of adaptive eating utensils and found that it was important to know that I did NOT need to go with the expensive ones to get something that works well. The $60 soup spoon didn't work any better than the $9 one.
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Reply to Teri4077
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There is a terrific book titled "One-Handed in a Two-Handed World" that covers almost every issue you can think of for doing things one-handed. The third (most recent" edition was published in 2007, but it's still useful--I own it. The author is Tommye-Karen Mayer, who herself suffered a stroke when she was in her 20s. Don't be misled if you see it with a 2013 publication date--it's the same book with a different publisher. You can order through Amazon, but it will actually come from a 3rd-party seller. It's not cheap, but it's well worth it.
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Reply to caroli1
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Tervis makes mugs and tumblers with lids. You can use a straw or just sip directly from them. They are what Papa uses since he has tremors in his hands and since he has to use a walker, he can just close the lid and put it in his basket.
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Reply to BeckyT
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1. I'm glad OT or hospice isn't either or.
2. Time is important to regain function.
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Reply to maryqesq1
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He may not like this, there are child bowls and plates with a suction cup on the bottom so the bowl/plate won't slide. The placemates recommended com as placemats if you don't want to by a roll of moecam recommends. You can buy cups that have lids and straws. They come in some pretty patterns. Also, they are insulated so drinks stay cold. Bed,bath and beyond sell Trevis tumblers and lids to go with them. One lid I bought can be used with a straw the other has a slit for drinking.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Buy placemat materialthat is made of rubberized webbing which are often for using out doors but you can buy it by the roll at the dollar store - cut a placemat for everyone to have 1 - use rest for other places he might need this like under combs etc - they wash easily & come in many colours - I use some in car to stop things from sliding around

Once items stay put then he will have an easier time of it - as to bread to push food on fork is this a new habit or a life long habit because they mean different things - FYI when my son was young his nana gave him a fork set with a 'pusher' which was used much like the bread your dad was using so maybe you can find/adapt a plate with a straight end to push his fork against -

If adapting try gluing a small washable item to 1 side of plate even a plastic box with straight not sloped sides so that you could put 1 item in it like peas so it so that there would be 360 for that but the edge would be available for other items - just insure that it is food safe & that there is a complete seal around so nothing can creep under - however it might not stack well nor be usable in a dishwasher
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Reply to moecam
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You can get food guards that provide a little "wall" on a plate. Many of them are designed for smaller plates (from a bygone era, I guess!)
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Reply to LaurenBond
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Put his food in small bowls. Then he has the far edge of the bowl to push against. If need be put the bowl on a towel or something to keep it from sliding on a slippery table top.
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Reply to Bobby40
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Plate with the raised edge, high sides, let them use a spoon or fork to push food against it. This really helps! I've seen that in action by several people.
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Reply to BootShopGirl
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I would add homeafterstroke.blogspot.com/ -- a blogger who had a stroke after years of working as a professional PT for stroke victims! Lots of tips and tricks if you browse her blog.
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Reply to maggiebea
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Tiny; if your hospice organization tells you that dad can't get hospice, show them the link. The sooner you get dad hooked up with OT, the better the outcome of his therapy will be.

Hospice should be fully covered by Medicare; are you paying anything out of pocket for Hospice?  I've never heard of that. 
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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Thank you everyone SOOOO much for the helpful websites.

BarbBrooklyn... once again... you're such a rockstar!!! I was really scratching my head trying to figure out how I was going to pay for OT and Hospice.

I plan on making a decision and ordering some adaptive eating utensils this weekend. A soup bowl with a handle... who knew?
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Reply to anonymous262233
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TinyBlu, I am impressed with all that you have already done for your Dad! It can be overwhelming as to what utensils and adaptive equipment to get. Your choices of adaptive equipment needs to be based on what your Dad can and cannot do; and on how well he can use certain adaptive equipment.

I have included some websites that might be helpful.

American Stroke Association: www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/

National Stroke Association: www.stroke.org/

Stroke Rehab: www.stroke-rehab.com/ offers an e-book for $15.00, a Stroke Rehab Blog, Stroke Newsletters, Stroke Forum, and “Ask the Therapist”.

www.strokeaids.com/tips-for-eating-after-a-stroke/

www.stroke-rehab.com/adaptive-equipment.html

I hope that these websites can help you. Keep up the GREAT work that you are doing!
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Reply to DeeAnna
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For the eating and as a temp measure.
Stick a pencil or two (with bluetac) 1 x behind and one on the left side of where his plate will be. Something to shove against. Cut all into fork size pieces and let him loose. :)
Disclaimer - Fork not needed with soup. :)

Soup dishes with one handle so the last of it can be drunk.


Good luck
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Reply to BuzzyBee
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https://www.medicare.gov/what-medicare-covers/part-a/how-hospice-works.html

Your father can ABSOLUTELY get OT while on Hospice.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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