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We had noticed our mom had become increasingly more forgetful and was having a lot of difficulty knowing where she was or what she was doing.
Originally we brushed this off as forgetfulness from old age.
Our Primary health care Physician contacted us (who was also her neighbor for 15 years) and advised that we should take mom to a neurologist as she was showing significant signs of dementia.
After numerous tests the neurologist stated there were no issues and she passed the tests with flying colors.
We took steps to keep her safe despite the diagnosis taking the car away hiring aids etc. none of which were easy.
It is now about a year later and she has been getting progressively worse forgetting to pay bills, having trouble remembering grandchildren, appointments and more.
She is very distant and does not engage in any conversation unless pushed.
The agency we have who comes in 5 days a week to assist called and expressed concerns over her decline verifying what we had experienced.
Having concerns we made another appointment with the neurologist.
My sister took her and once again the neurologist said she passed all the tests and he has seen no decline.
Once they got back to the car my mom didn’t know where she was or why she was there. Then a half hour later she completely forgot everything.
It is obvious to all who know her she is not the same person and cannot function as she did.
How is it that a neurologist can say nothing is wrong?

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In my opinion, that doesn't seem right. If I were you, I would have her evaluated by a geriatric psychiatrist or a neuropsychologist. They can administer a comprehensive battery of tests as opposed to a screening. For all you know, the neurologist may only be administering a simple screen which your mom is able to squeak through. Good luck.
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Reply to Peanuts56
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It’s never a bad idea to get a second opinion if you doubt her current care from this doctor.

I have had situations in my own health where my specialist consulted with other specialists.

I admire someone who knows their limitations and will consult other experts in the area.

Her doctor should not object to wanting more information. If he does, he isn’t the doctor to see.

A doctor’s ego or ignorance or not being thorough has no place in practicing medicine.

There are many other resources to choose from. You are doing what is right by putting your mom’s wellbeing first and foremost. If that means a new doctor, so be it. They will get all medical records transferred to her new office and do their own testing as well.

Best wishes to you and your mom.
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Reply to NeedHelpWithMom
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My mom did this too. Fine at the dr office, different person once we left. I finally used the video recorder on my phone which was sticking out of a "pocket" on my purse. I did several and showed the dr how she was away from the office. Same with my husband who has good days as long as he takes his meds. He swore he was fine and I was crazy. Videos don't lie. He also has onset Alzheimers and his neurologist can see it clearly.
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Reply to cherokeewaha
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NeedHelpWithMom Mar 12, 2020
What a great idea! Pictures don’t lie.
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Definitely get another neurologist.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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What kind of test were done? When my mom was recommended for heart surgery I insisted that the surgeon test her for cognitive function because anesthesia can cause an increase in dementia in the elderly. The "test" consisted of a couple of easy questions and a connect-the-dots diagram. A 2 year old could have passed it!

Like your mom both my parents performed well on standard test but had difficulty with memory once we got home.
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Reply to Frances73
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Quit going to the same crack pot neurologist.  Take her to a place that specializes in geriatric care and dementia diagnosis.  There are many kinds of dementia...we believe my moms was caused by taking Benadryl every day for years and years.  Everything is not Alzheimers.  Take her somewhere else...many healthcare networks / Hospitals have senior care programs that test for dementia.
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Reply to Jamesj
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My husband was recommended to "one of the best" neurologists where we live and after 4 visits I was completely frustrated with his passive behavior, 'we'll see you again in 6 months' diagnoses...until my husband had a(another) stroke last year and the hospital sent in a guy who has changed our lives! Dr. A was up close and personal with my husband, having him stand up lie down stand up, remember words, travel the globe in different directions - a series of tests and questions the other Doctor NEVER dealt with. We have changed meds and altered diet intake, and while my husband is not improving greatly in any way his care is much more personal and compassionate. Keep looking for the doctor and care that you feel comfortable with. You won't hurt anyone's feelings!
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NeedHelpWithMom Mar 12, 2020
It’s true, a fresh pair of eyes can do wonders. I noticed that when my mom’s old primary care doctor retired and she got a new one. Same with my new doctor when my doctor retired. I like my new doctor better. She is more up to date.
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Hello,

I’m sorry for your frustrations. Definitely make another appointment to see another Neurologist, bring in notes in regards to her behavior and daily functions, mention that caretakers & ppl close to her notice a significant difference from how she used to be.

In the meantime take her for a complete bloodwork count and urinalysis to rule out any infections that may cause delirium...maybe a CT Scan/MRI of the brain to rule out any ischemic stroke to those specific parts of the brain that may also cause memory loss/confusion.

When in doubt go with your gut feeling...you’re usually 99% right! If your still not satisfied with the 2nd Neurologist visit, go see a Geriatrician too.

Good luck, I hope you find out soon what is mother’s medical state.
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Reply to Dollie1974
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Had the same problem with my Dad. Yes, get mom to a new neurologist, preferably one which understands about geriatric health. Memory issues can be caused by numerous factors including UTI, hearing etc. Getting a brain scan would aid in if there is plaque buildup leading to a diagnosis of dementia/Alzheimer's. Neurological disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer's have some basic cognitive function tests ran during a visit. Make sure when you make appointment you make it very clear about her memory issues, have a list of issues you have encountered.
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Reply to thingsarecrazy8
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Yes, I would say it's time to take your mother to a different neurologist. Perhaps the neighbor-physician can make some recommendations. (And it's may be that your mother's current neurologist should go to a different one--as a patient!)
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Reply to jacobsonbob
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She needs to get Brain MRI
my mother had this tests when I first started taking her to neurologist. He showed me little white spots on film were mini strokes that caused the dementia. that was 7 years ago. She will be 93 in a couple of weeks. She was able to walk w walker then but now immobile & wheelchair bound. You can get second opinion & take copies of all tests with you.
Hugs 🤗
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Reply to CaregiverL
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NeedHelpWithMom Mar 12, 2020
This happened to my friend’s sister. She is 50 with Down’s syndrome. She never had any issues walking. Apparently, it’s not uncommon for Down’s patients to get dementia later on and she refused to walk and is now in a wheelchair as well. Interesting, isn’t it?
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What tests did the neurologist do?
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Reply to Countrymouse
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I would take her to another neurologist too. First time my Mom went, she did well on the tests but you knew something was just not right and so did the doctor. Did you give the doctor a list of concerns? Things the aides were seeing. I agree, time for more intensive testing. Bloodwork, EEG, etc. Get the aides to write down what they see and you too. Take them with you to the new doctor. It will help in him asking the right questions.

I posted a link to an article the other day called, "Robin Williams death: the nine things to know about Dementia" The article says its important that you know the type of Dementia a person has because of medications. An example given was Lewy Body vs Parkinsons. Its hard to distinguish between the two. Giving someone suffering from LB a Parkinsons Med could be deadly.

https://m.activebeat.com/your-health/women/robin-williams-death-9-things-to-know-about-lewy-body-dementia/?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=AB_GGL_US_MOBI-SearchMarketing_TR&utm_content=g_t_303659477023&cus_widget=&utm_term=lewy%20body%20dementia&cus_teaser=kwd-35132660&utm_acid=3040947159&utm_caid=1599827680&utm_agid=62022144433&utm_os=&utm_pagetype=multi&gclid=CjwKCAiA7t3yBRADEiwA4GFlIwXNqttVn7Uds_rHQseE0Lf2rFXNN0wDvS4RrIV-lP80ott8wAXsuRoClvoQAvD_BwE
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Is there a Memory Care clinic somewhere nearby? A neurologist who specializes in say, brain tumors, might have more trouble diagnosing a disease like dementia that has few physical markers. A Memory Care clinic might give a more thorough examination that your mom might have more trouble "showtiming" through.

Also, what are you hoping to achieve with the diagnosis? Are you hoping there will be some pharmaceutical solutions? It sounds as though you have already convinced her to stop driving and accept in home help. What other goals would a diagnosis help you achieve? What other supports would the caregiver agency who reported her decline like to see?
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