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I know I have OSA because I did a sleep study and was diagnosed. I use a CPAP which helps, but it helped much more when I first got it, I think my throat has built up resistance to it. I think I might also have mild narcolepsy because when I go to sleep my dreaming is immediate, I've always been that way, but I've read its normal to sleep a long time before dreaming occurs. Also lately I've had a lot of nights where I only sleep about 2 hours or less.., is this insomnia? Is it possible that I have all 3 of these sleep disorders? And more importantly do you have any advice for me? Thank you.

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CaptainCPAP, depending on your age your lack of sleep may be an unfortunate sign of normal aging. As people get older it is normal to get less sleep, and not only less sleep but the quality of sleep you get decreases as well.

Your dreams vary based off of the brain activity you have and your brain goes through a set pattern over time. During REM sleep your brain "dreams" and it isn't unusual as you age for that cycle to become slightly off.

My advice to you would be to take a look at your sleeping habits. Try to get on a sleep schedule and stick to it! Do not take little or frequent naps during the day and do not stay up all night. Avoid energy drinks, caffeinated beverages or energy supplements prior to bedtime. Try these and you may find improvement.

I'm a doctor and I'm always answering free questions if you have other questions let me know.
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From Mayo Clinic's website: People with narcolepsy may have other sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which breathing starts and stops throughout the night, restless legs syndrome and even insomnia. People with narcolepsy may also act out their dreams at night by flailing their arms or kicking and screaming.

If you go to Mayo Clinic's website, they also have some recommendations for steps to take, but the major one is to see your doctor. Start with the one who recommended the sleep study.
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Hey CaptainCPAP! I have one too, and so does my husband. It is not uncommon for people to need more air pressure to get the same result.

They have a new thing called a Auto-PAP so that you can do a kind of sleep study in your own bed. The thing can sense when air isn't getting through, and increases the pressure until it does. You use it for three nights. It records the highest pressure needed, and they reset the pressure on your CPAP to make it high enough.

Now I'm going to get mean. I have insomnia too, and I know that the best thing for it is exercise. When I get even 30 minutes of walking, I feel better and seep better. Do I do it often enough? Of course not! But you should do as I say, not as I do, and get more exercise. lol.
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