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Mom has all the classic symptoms of dementia. At the same time, she also has all the classic symptoms of NPH. We were told to look for WWW - wacky, wobbly, wet. I don't think you can sort one wacky out from another and urinary incontinence comes with both also. But what about falling? With NPH the falls are backwards - is it the same with dementia? Mom definitely has a preference for falling backwards. Testing for NPH requires a surgical procedure. Is it worth it?

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Just an update. The neurologist finally got back to us. She does not think Mom's year old MRI indicates NPH - but - her recent loss of abilities do fit the profile. We plan on testing Mom in December.
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Thanks! I watched that and the following gait demonstration video. It sure looks familiar.
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My neighbor has NPH and his bounce-back was pretty amazing. He's 75 now, I think, so was about 72 when he was diagnosed. He was in a wheelchair and had full on dementia symptoms. Now he's walking and talking and is back to his normal old curmudgeon self.

I think if the tests aren't too invasive and there's any question, it's worth testing. Does your mom have the shuffling gait that people with NPH often have? Have you seen the 60 Minutes segment on it? If not, go to youtube and search for "60 Minutes + NPH" to watch it.
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Sort of. We have a good neurologist who consults with others specializing in various disorders. The question has been posed to her by myself and our visiting nurse. I'll wait for her response I guess. Mom's to the point that we think more about making her happy than making her 'better' - but you just hate to overlook something that could make a big difference.
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My mother was tested for this at 83, and was found to have it. She had surgery (a shunt put in her brain) last year, and she has to have testing every 6 months to make sure the shunt is working and determine if it needs adjustment.

The testing is not difficult - it's an outpatient procedure and takes a few hours. They insert a needle and drain some spinal fluid out. It's supposed to relieve the pressure temporarily and mimic the effect of the surgery.

The surgery did help my Mom somewhat, in the incontinence issue mostly. It was not a miracle cure. It can be, though, especially with the falling. My mother doesn't fall as much but she still can't walk more than a dozen steps. I think she was already too debilitated to gain as much benefit from the surgery as someone treated when younger and healthier. It really depends on your parent's overall health and capability. Good luck!
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Very often,b im told, the neuropsychological testing (paper and v penvil testing) can distinguish between the two. Are you talking to a neurologist who specializes in dementia?
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Brain scans yes - but we were told because the pressure is so close to normal scans can miss it. We do know for sure she has vascular dementia. I'm not sure what you mean by neuropsych. Lumbar puncture, no. That's what I'm wondering if we should do.
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Treatment requires surgery. Have they done brain scans, neuropsych testing and a lumbar punture?
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