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I've been handling my daddy's finances for 5 years now, but his mind is slipping away at a more progressive rate now. He knows his mind is turning on him, as he put's it, but swears he doesn't have dementia. He forgets friends names that he has known for years now. He also has degenerative disc disease, & spinal stenosis, & can't get around very well. I also have a grown brother & sister who live with us also, who don't help at all. I've learned a lot of patience with him, & sometimes just agree with him, even when he's dead wrong. Should I pacify him, correct him, or just go with the flow ?

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Its better not to correct him. You said that your father is strong and independent, so if you start correcting him, he may understand that something's wrong with him. If he feels so, he may think about it continuously and it may affect his health. He's strong, so let him be strong till the end. Be your dad's support and make him feel comfortable.
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My Dad has dementia. There's no point in trying to explain to him that he has dementia. Even if I convinced him in this moment he would forget 10 minutes later.

At best I'll sometimes comment that his memory is not what it used to be but at his age that's expected. He's fine with that concept. No one wants to be told their brain is broken and getting worse.

Tell your Dad what ever works, keep him happy and calm.
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Dawn, I think your instincts are good, and obviously you know your father better than any of us can. It's difficult for someone to admit that he/she isn't as cognitively sharp as we used to be (and it happens to caregivers and people w/o dementia too).

There's an overload of information available, and not so subtlely pushed onto consumers. We have to make decisions constantly how much we'll let into our lives, and that includes an adaptive approach for those with dementia. Your father doesn't need to know about a lot of things, especially in the political realm, that he can't do anything about or control.

Better to focus on what he can do. In that respect, try to find ways he can do projects he used to enjoy, but on a smaller scale. Plan plenty of rest and downtime inbetween so he can rest his back.

If he can still walk, albeit for short distances, go for walks, especially now that the weather is moderating and the color show is beginning. Nature has healing powers that pharmaceutical manufacturers can only wish for.

It is a delicate balance though to address the emotional and intellectual needs of someone who's independent but also dependent. I'm still working my way through this and learning new adaptations.
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I completely agree that is what I have been doing for the past about eight months when he asked a question I act like I forgot it to pacifying him basically trying to keep him happy I love him very much and he is so independent and he's so dependent on me and I just want to make sure I treat him with the love and respect that he deserves
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Why would you want to tell a strong, independent person that he does have dementia? What purpose would it serve? Better to find a way to support him, encourage him to do what he can and find ways to compensate for his forgetfulness. Dealing with spinal issues is challenging enough.
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