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I'm caretaking for my mom and she can get very jealous and demanding when I have my grandkids. How to explain to them she is getting dementia and acts out which upsets one child they are ages 12/9/2. Thanks

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Thank you. We did and it said it was clear. I have read after sepsis which is horrible that it can cause dementia and being scared . She was seeing things on the ceiling and thinking her bed was in air. She was holding on for dear life. She got over that and seemed ok. Then the real dreams started and thinking animals were in her house and during the day she is ok when it's just us.
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Just a thought, I am not a doctor, I would have her tested for a UTI again. This may explain her newest bout of confusion. Sometimes UTIs are not fully cleared or they can return.
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I guess more explanation is needed. Sorry. I live next door to my mom and she fell and broke arm and then got uti with sepsis. Since then she is acting out dreams and getting more confused. This is new for all of us. I'm staying full time with her now. Everyday is different but I'm learning how to deal pretty good. I have basically given up my life and I'm not complaining because I feel blessed to have my mama. She's 93 and all grandkids are used to her being ok just old. This is recent. Maybe 4 weeks now that's it's very noticeable. Last time I kept kids she started saying I was trying to turn them against her which upset 1 because I had just had talk with him and telling him she forgets sometimes and that how much I love her no matter what. Soo. New to all this.
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Unfortunately, Tammy64, there are no hard and fast rules when dealing with loved ones with dementia. I am sorry your mother isn't reacting well to your grandchildren. It may be difficult for your youngest grandchildren to understand why your mother acts out. For the older ones, you can explain your mother is sick and not herself (I am a fan of the upfront and honest approach). I do have other questions for you, however: Is your mother diagnosed with a condition that would explain her diagnosis? Has she been acting out more recently than previously?
Perhaps sharing happy stories of your mother with your grandchildren will help them understand she is still your mother but just not herself.
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