Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
You start out with compassion. It's very hard for them to have to give up control of their finances. They've had so many other losses that many elders hang on long after they should. Still, if you approach them with understanding and compassion, and acknowledge that you know this is hard for them, but it's necessary for all of us to appoint someone to take care of financial decisions should we need help, they may be more apt to listen.
Also, a good friend closer to their own age can be helpful. Often people get tired of the adult children being "the boss." Hearing the urgency that they appoint a POA from someone in their own generation that they respect may make them more flexible. It's also possible that a clergy person could help. You may have to try several times, so be patient.
Good luck,
Carol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.