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I say yes, my sister says no. My sister says she would rather eat right, exercise and let nature take it's course.
I say I would like to know what the possibilities are. If there is a chance I have the predisposition to have AD, I want to be prepared. My mother, in spite of the fact she had a trust account, was NOT prepared for her mental decline and the family went thru hell taking care of all the details she was mentally unable to tend to.
I would like to know that if I am going to have "it", my daughter and her husband won't have to put me thru the indignity of what we were forced to put Mother thru.
What do you think?

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I also echo PSTEGAMN's statement on the importance of DPOA, Advanced Directives, Health Care proxy etc. with the help of an attorney and a financial advisor.
My brother and my hands are tied because we do not have these and my mother refuses.
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Yes I would. I want to be prepared.
I hope to be able to participate in genetic testing and other Altz studies if and when my 27/7 caregiving days are not all consuming.
As the disease progresses, I hope that it will allow me more time away from caregiving so that I can give back.
I thinking genetic testing and research are ways that we can help find ways to treat and manage the disease (especially for caregivers that are impacted).
I hope that I do not develop the disease and think about this possibility often as my 78 year old mother and 81 year old aunt both have Dementia.
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I think that we should all assume that if we live long enough we are at great risk for developing dementia or some other disabling chronic condition.

So I think that you and your sister (and me, and everyone else) should do your best to keep your affairs in order, prepare as well as possible for the probability you will need assistance in your old age, and live your life fully while you can. You don't need a test to do these things.

Know that even if you don't have a predisposition to develop AD you could have a stroke and develop vascular dementia, or have Lewy Body Dementia, or get Parkinson's or ... well, there are just no guarantees. About 40% of all cases of dementia are NOT AD. So I don't know how reassuring it would be to know you do not have the genetics for AD.
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I'm afraid to take it almost 100 percent of my dad's family who lived to be over75 have or had it. No one on my mother side did or does. So I guess I have a 50/50 chance I'll live as healthy as a 24/7 caregiver can & hope I inherited my moms genes. On the other hand I just might want to stop being a 24 hour caregiver and enjoy the years that my mind works so my answer is I'm not sure I want to know but I just might be too scared to find out
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If you test positive and notice even mild symptoms, you ask your MD about a baseline MRI or CT of the brain. Early treatment delays the progression of the disease. Researchers are working on novel treatments to remove the beta amyloid plaques.
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No, what would I do if my test were positive? Gene Conrad
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Genetic tests only show a possibility. It would be far more practical to spend your money on things like a DPOA, Advanced Directives, Health Care proxy etc. with the help of an attorney and a financial advisor.
Testing large numbers of women for the breast cancer gene ultimately proved to researchers that not everyone with a gene gets the disease. They found that Diet, Lifestyle and Stress were part of the equation.
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