Follow
Share

She is a relative who needs the job and is loved by my parents, but we suspect she has been stealing his controlled substance pain killers. No way to prove this at this time, but we are receiving reports from the hired caregivers of missing meds. How should we handle this?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
Before you make the accusations, you're going to have to make sure they are valid. Then you can start with the pharmacy to see what quantity was in the bottle. After that, then have a locking cabinet, where only 1 person has the key.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Lantz this is very serious theft. Who ever is stealing Your Dads pain killers must be addicted to drugs and are betraying Your trust, as well as causing Your Father un necessary pain. AN AQUAINTANCE OF MINE WHO OWNS A THRIVING BAR & RESTRAUNT TOLD ME THAT HE WAS MISSING A PILE OF MONEY ONE TIME, AND THIS WAS HAPPENING OVER A LONG PERIOD OF TIME BUT HE WAS UNABLE TO FIND THE THIEF. HE CALLED TO THE POLICE AND REPORTED THE THEFT, STATING THAT THIS THIEVING WAS STILL GOING ON. THE POLICE CALLED TO HIS BAR & RESTRAUNT BEFORE OPENING TIME, AND THEY SET THE TRAP. THE POLICE SAID TO THE BUSINESS OWNER..PUT A PILE OF €50 NOTES ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE TILL AND TELL ALL THE STAFF BEFORE OPENING TIME NOT TO TOUCH THE CASH OF €50 NOTES...WHICE HE DID. HENCE IT HAD BEEN A RECORD BREAKING BUSY NIGHT, AND THE BAR & RESTRAUNT WERE OVER FLOWING WITH CUSTOMERS, THUS THE EMPLOYER SWITCHED OFF THE LIGHTS, AND SWITCHED ON THE INFRO RED LIGHTING, AND THERE THE THIEF WAS STANDING BEFORE EVERY ONE AND GUILTY AS SIN BECAUSE BOTH OF HIS HANDS WERE SMUDGED IN DYE. THE TWO POLICE OFFICERS WERE INCOGNITO WHILE DINING, AND THEY MOVED IN TO ARREST THE CULPIT.
Lantz123 go to the Police and report this theft of Your Fathers pain killers and the Culpit will be caught RED HANDED.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

You could get your proof, first, and go from there. Are the meds kept in place where you could put a camera? You can get a remote-viewed, auto recording, interior home camera for $50 USD on Amazon. It is accessed by wifi so there would need to be wifi access in the location.

I think cameras are the answer to everything in caregiving lol. I wish I would've put them in years ago due to having different people in and out on different days. Just helps to keep track of things, including how my father is doing on any given day.

In this case, you don't want to accuse w/o proof...? I personally would want confirmation of a culprit before I say anything.

So maybe instead of focusing on what has already happened, which you don't have proof of, let that go and do as others suggested - blister packs, initials, logs, locked away. Or a camera. :-)
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I agree about the understanding but...she is stealing a DEA controlled drug. A person is suffering because of this. This person should not be a caregiver.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Just a comment, and a little off topic: the new laws surrounding the prescribing of controlled substances has been a royal pain for drs and patients alike. It has not curbed the "drug problem" in America one iota. Addicts still get their drugs, and people who are chronic pains sufferers often suffer much more than they should have to simply because of regulations that limit drs from treating patients as they were before. I am a chronic pain sufferer. I get x amount of a mild narcotic pain reliever to last me a month. I cannot have a "bad day" and take an extra pill, for then I come up short at the end of the month. You live your life around the 2 hours out of 6 that the pain abates enough so you can actually function. I feel for the person who is taking the drugs---addict, thief..whatever. But I can see why they might be tempted---when you are in pain 24/7....365....it just wears you out. My GP is as frustrated as I am with her inability to write me enough meds to really help. We may be judging this person pretty harshly, when what she needs is understanding and some help.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I think the blister packs r a good idea. Yes, prescription pain killers are DEA controlled and can only be dispenced once a month with a prescription from the Dr. So when stealing can't get more. This is serious.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

If your father is in an IL situation and has access to his own meds, before you attack the caregiver--make sure dad isn't self medicating (accidentally or purposefully) Many pills look alike and older people will sometimes confuse a pain pill with something else. The sweet woman I worked for finally was given some 5mg Lortab to take, but she was terrified of them, having taken nothing in her life but aspirin for pain. She tried to break them in half herself and wound up with a bottle of powdery bits and pieces of pills. I got permission from the family to buy a pill cutter and cut them cleanly. She was taking "a chunk or two" of the pills. She also thought at times they were her vitamins, or one of her Parkinson meds. Also she was dropping stuff all the time and when I would clean I ALWAYS found meds under her bed. Always.
I'm sure that in IL they offer "med assistance" and then the dosage and time of distribution is charted. If this is one of the staff, they will be caught quickly.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I have a Sister-in-Law who worked for Hospice. This is a common problem and if the person stealing is addicted, they will not stop with just a warning. A talking to isn't going to stop it. The pills must be under lock and key and all the other good advice must be followed. Addicts cannot stop..
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

A sit down with all those who can access the medications is the only way to get this under control. Tell them you are aware of the problem and that there are "this many" pills missing, and that from this point forward, the situation will be closely monitored, and that you will go to the police if nessesary, and that his Dr is being apprised of the situation, and that the poor old man may now be forced to endure additional pain, because of someone's fraudulent doings. Be serious, stern, and upset that you even have to speak on such matters! Grrr! It's disgusting behavior! Good luck!
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

You do what the facilities do. You get the meds in blister packs and they initial each one dispensed. Keep the meds in a locked cabinet and only aides have the key. Easy to do.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

That's what I was wondering, GA.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Sorry - just checked your profile and I see that your father is in IL.

Still, I think the idea of monitoring might help clarify who the culprit is.

I'm assuming that you're ruled out your father accidentally or intentionally taking an extra pill here and there for the condition for which the pills were prescribed?
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Create and ask each of them to post on a pain med dispensing chart - number of pills in bottle, number left, times administered. Then you have a daily log of who's dispensing the pills.

If you're on site (or perhaps you can create a cyber log that provides you with an update each time a pill is administered), you can tighten control. That might stop the theft, if it exists.

What the story on her access - is she in your father's home or caregiving full time with supplemental help from other caregivers?
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I would start by having a face to face meeting with all the caregivers together. Mention that he is short on his meds and that he needs them to control his pain and can not get more until his script is due. Don't single out any one of them, just put them all equally on notice that you are watching and it has to end. If you feel you need to add a little weight to the argument then consult with local police to see what the penalties might be if you choose to report the theft. Hopefully that will be the end of it.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Who has access to the meds?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.