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Tread carefully. If the caregiver takes offense and leaves, what's the end game? Does the elderly person have other resources for care? Is the elder's home and income threatened? Is the elder incompetent? Perhaps they've given permission.

I agree with Sharyn Marie -- get the facts first and then talk it over with the caregiver (and I would add the care receiver, if s/he is competent). Be sure there's a real threat here and not just someone wanting to mind another's business and/or hoard assets for their own inheritance.
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I don't know about Adult Protective Services anywhere else, but the one in Alameda County, California is a joke. They were called many times about the abuse my mother was going through, and when they called the abuser/POA to give up bank statements, she ignored them, and APS did nothing...no matter how often they were called over half a decade. They came to the home and saw it neat and clean and that my 90+ old mother was comfortable. They "saw" no abuse each time. Worthless!
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First I find out if there is documented evidence. Then talk with the person involved. Sometime people tend to think that a person in the family who is caregiving is taking advantage. While this is true that it happens...it is not always the case with everyone You can call Adult Protective Services or the Area Agency on Aging for help; Good luck to you...you really are not providing much information for most of us to really help. Hugs to you!! .
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