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Hi, i know many assisted living facilities in the country as i did a lot of research on them a while ago for my dad who is also suffering from Alzheimers.He is now at Luvida care Belton, Tx. Luvida care provides assistant living for Alzheimer's patients.
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Captain, it's funny that you mention reading medical articles from the U.K. I have been doing that too & finding a lot more helpful information. Also New Zealand, Australia & Japan are good too, they tend to give more details. I suppose in the U.S. we are assumed to be too stupid to understand.
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KeepontryintM...
PLEASE don't give up on finding a good support group. The first support group my Mom and I attended was, much as the one you describe, not very supportive. It was held at a relatively new nursing home/Alzheimer's unit and moderated by an employee at the home. Someone opened with a magic trick (?) then everyone was asked to introduce themselves and say something about their experience with their loved one's battle with Alzheimer's, etc. Everyone talked about themselves, vacations they were taking, extracurricular activities, etc. There was very little mention of their loved ones, problems they were having as caregivers, etc. There was no program, no information given or discussed. We tried this group several times, but it was always the same thing. While at an educational program at another nursing home we were given info about another support group and told that it seemed to match us better. We attended this group the next month and have been going for about a year now. Its held at a church. We're all grouped around several tables put together so we have close contact. There are a couple of moderators who alternate or sometimes attend together. We now have a counselor who attends. The people are all regular everyday folks who talk about the trials and tribulations they face every day, how their loved ones are doing, how they're driven crazy and have their own health problems due to the constant caregiving, etc. Its a place to talk, to vent, to show and accept understanding and love, to laugh, to cray and to just be able to talk to others who are going through the same thing. We receive handouts and discuss them. We ask questions and give each other answers. There IS a support group out there for you, and its important for you to find one that you're comfortable with. Please keep looking!
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I agree with virtualhorizon, I also went to various support groups and found one I like. Its been over a year and I have found a wonderful friend. Our meeting is once a month but my friend and I get together for lunch almost every week. If we are having a bad day we even call each other and help in any way we can. The group does become family and you can vent about anything because we are all in the same boat and understand what each of us are going through. Good luck in finding a support group. I can't express how much I look forward to them. Hugs
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I have found the best place to start is alz.org. The Alzheimer's organization can tap their database and give you names of people, places and contacts for you. In AZ, there is a yearly update with the researchers (7 companies/hospitals) who share information with the public. AZ is the leader in research for Alzheimer's (we have so many seniors living here), and another resource is WebMD since they have all the addresses of resources. Good luck and I am sorry this is one experience in life you have to endure. I'm a nurse and it is tough for me too.
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I'd like to know the answer to this one too. I went to a support group called "Caring for the caregiver". The leader spent 15 minutes of the hour explaining how were now to call them "Older Adults" instead of "Seniors". Another 15 we introduced our selves. Then she read something about how to talk to people with "Alzheimer's ". Which left about 5 minutes for questions.

It did nothing to support me. And some of the people in the group had it much worse off than me, it just made me feel guilty for wanting some support.
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Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease is physically and emotionally demanding. Feelings of anger and guilt, stress and discouragement, worry and grief, and social isolation are common. Caregiving can even take a toll on the caregiver's physical health. But paying attention to your own needs and well-being is one of the most important things you can do for yourself and for the person with Alzheimer's. If you're a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer's, you can help yourself by:

Learning as much about the disease as you can
Asking questions of doctors, social workers and others involved in the care of your loved one
Calling on friends or other family members for help when you need it
Taking a break every day
Spending time with your friends
Taking care of your health by seeing your own doctors on schedule, eating healthy meals and getting exercise
Joining a support group
Making use of a local adult day center, if possible
Many people with Alzheimer's and their families benefit from counseling or local support services. Contact your local Alzheimer's Association affiliate to connect with support groups, doctors, resources and referrals, home care agencies, residential care facilities, a telephone help line, and educational seminars. This is a tough job by any means, so use every resource available to you, but most of all watch out for you. All the best to you.
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Dawney --
Check with your local/nearest Alzheimer's Association. My local association has some great educational meetings. Though you might already know most everything they talk about at the different meetings, sometimes other attendees bring up ideas and problems that you find you have in common with them, you're able to discuss them on a one-on-one or small meeting basis, and those people will be there for added support. I've found that every time I attend one of these meetings I find something useful to help me along. Also, check to see if there are Alzheimer support groups in your area. I attend a support group with my Mom (my Dad has Alzheimer's) once a month. There are about 10 of us on average, including a facilitator and most recently a counselor. When you're with a small group like this you again have some one-on-one time, are able to vent with people who are going through the same things as you, etc. It might take a few visits to various groups to find the one you're most comfortable with (we visited several before finding the one we attend) but it is well worth it. Several of the attendees have lost their loved one with the past six months but they continue to attend to offer support for the rest of us...and to receive their own support following their loss. You really become a family with the other people in the group. Go to the Alzheimer's Association web site. It contains great information. Read all you can about the disease (as much as you don't want to!). There's a great book called 'Still Alice' by Lisa Genova; also 'The 36 Hour Day' by Mace & Rabins. Check the web for more caregiver support sites like this one. And keep asking questions here! Hang in there...
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im sure there are alz seminars being conducted all thru the country but after recently attending a couple of the meetings i found that they had little to add to what id already learned just by reading online. i like medical articles from the uk. theirs is socialized medicine and you dont have to be taken for a spin by american style capitalists trying to promote and idea or concept for personal or corporate gain.
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