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I tried Killer by Kellerman. It was very boring. Thanks, Christine(spouse)

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Thank you all so much! Sometimes I can find answers to my situation by myself but oftern I need input from others--that gets me thinking! Seeing that you all have experience is extremely helpful to me! I would never have thought of marking the end of sentences! I would not have thought about the specifics of being unable to follow--or retain what my husband is trying to read. Today (I think today) his new glasses should be ready. That in itself might help matters considerably--duh! I bought him a kindle for him to use in rehab last month, but he did not use it. He likes his Telikin computer (ads in AARP) . This brand has more graphics and is made for "the elderly." Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! I welcome any ideas you have for us. I use the library extensively. I tried a CD so he could listen to a novel. Darn--it happened to be boring even for me and both of us usually like Kellerman's books. The title was Killer. The beginning was mostly describing theory about children who had bad experiences. Maybe the rest of the book got better, but neither of us had the patience to find out. I will be trying your suggestions!! chris
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I'm also curious what his issue with reading is since the stroke?

For my mom, her comprehension of language is greatly diminished, so books on tape would ALL be boring to her;she wouldn't understand them.

On the other had, I had a colleague whose dad had a visual issue after a stroke, which we were able to ameliorate by go ogling the specific symptom. He couldn't tell where the line of text ended. The "fix" is to stick a post at the edge of the text. The change in color was enough of a signal to have him move on to the next line. I would talk to his treating doctor in detail about what damage was done by the stroke.
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What about circa 1980's? Isaac Asimov, Michael Creighton, and others.
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What did he like to read before the stroke? I'd try more of same.

My husband always loved hearing me read to the children. He'd sit in the next room, pretending to be reading the newspaper. He loved Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer and How to Eat Fried Worms. Also Cheaper by the Dozen. Husband and boys were all enthralled when I read The Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway.

He loved reading Tom Clancy and John Grisham.

My husband was an engineer, but reading tastes are highly personal. If your husband didn't read much before, just trial-and-error your way into figuring out what he likes.

And good for you for helping him find interesting entertainment!
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You might want to check out your library's access to digital audio books if you are into technology. Our library offers a huge selection of books to download or stream though your browser, the selection of books on CD is much more limited.
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There are also books on Bill Gates.
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I think you could probably access the local library system's books on tape, by category. In our area, several of the community libraries share inventories, and can order a book from another library.

One subject that I've found fascinating, which might appeal to someone with computer skills, is that of Fractals. I don't know though whether it's available as a book on tape. It is a subject though that I think is best read in print, or at least if photos are available, to see the relationships discussed in the book.

The Journey is the Reward is a book about Jobs and the early beginnings of Apple.

For other historical issues, there's always the Industrial Revolution, which combines not only the technological but the social aspects of that period.

Some of the financial pioneers such as J. P. Morgan, Vanderbilt and Rockefeller might be interesting from the point of their own involvement in large scale industrial and technological movements.

Another fascinating but somewhat depressing issue is why the Titanic really sank.

I've read a couple of fiction books about computer game theories mingled with espionage; I'll check "my libaray!" and see if I can remember which ones they were.

I don't know, however, if they're available on tape.
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Tom Clancy--I had forgotten about him. You are right. John loves history and nonfiction stuff. Any specific authors or titles?

I got him Killer by Kellerman--poor choice . Very boring. chris
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In general, as the daughter, sister and spouse of engineers and computer types, non fiction trumps fiction. Biographies, military history. Maybe tom clancy in the fiction realm.
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Try walter Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs
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