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My step father recently passed away and I would like to get a gift for the workers in the residential care home he was staying at. He wasn’t always very easy to deal with, and they were wonderful. Any suggestions?

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Along with all of the other good suggestions -- my suggestion is to write a letter to the manager of the facility, as well as, the corporate company if there is one.

If there were several people that were especially kind and helpful - I would include their names in the letter. It (probably) can't hurt for the employee to get praise for a job well done and it might get a copy put in their employee file at the very least. Maybe an increase in wage and/or help with a nomination for employee of the month, etc.
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A lot of caregivers are overworked and vastly underpaid, so gift cards would be appreciated. Aim for places that everybody uses, like Target or Amazon. And a gushing letter to the bosses is always good.
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Where my dad lives, they do not allow employees to accept gifts other than the residents holiday gift fund that is divided up among staff. So check on that first. Although I’m sure they would allow a food gift. A letter I agree with another poster, is meaningful
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As a healthcare worker myself, here are suggestions that have been appreciated (In rising level of costs...):

1. Bring a case of oranges. This is nice as it is available to all shifts and stays fresh/clean as opposed to a cake or such that looks pretty sad after it starts getting used.
2. Offer to provide a delivered meal to a staff meeting. Can be as simple as bagels or as big as a full meal from a restaurant.
3. Offer to fund, in whole or in part a holiday party for the staff. Fewer work places fund these anymore.
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I'd check to make sure they are able to receive gifts. I know that while normally I give Christmas gifts to the staff at my LO's facility, I recently read that it's not legal in some places. I hadn't even thought of that. I'm going to look into it, but, since your LO is deceased, perhaps, the same rules would not abide. If gifts are allowed, I might ask if the facility needs a tv for the break room, coffee machine, or microwave. Or boxes of doughnuts for each shift.
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Most places have restrictions on the monetary value of what can be given. So check that first.
A lunch delivered would be nice. Pick the time so it is end of one shift and the start of another. Sub sandwiches, pizza would be good and for early morning shifts donuts and coffee
And the ultimate...
For each staff person that made a positive impact write a note of appreciation and send a copy of the note to administration so a copy can be put in the employment record.
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I’m very sorry for the loss of your stepfather.

A number of facilities owned by large corporations have very strict rules regarding gifts. Often they are allowed but limited in value (under $20.00 for example) and other times they are completely forbidden. Keep in mind that breaking those rules can result in the employees’ reprimand or termination. Please check with administration before you do anything.

In my many years of working in facilities, the most appreciated was when a family would bring in lunch or dinner. Pizzas and salad or sandwich platters and fruit bowls, you get the idea. It demonstrated their appreciation, did not interfere with the work that needed to be done and didn’t exclude or emphasize any individual. If there is a few employees you would like to acknowledge above and beyond, a personal handwritten card is perfect. It will touch their hearts and reaffirm the good work they are doing.
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Judysai422 Nov 29, 2019
You are so right. Both of the facilities my parents were in had a holiday fund campaign. You can make a donation and it is split among the employees. That plus a meal would be wonderful. I agree that a positive note is excellent. It helps the employee build their resume.
I would shy away from sweets...many of the workers are overweight and when my parents put out candy treats last year, most declined.
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I’m very sorry for your loss. I think having food delivered like someone already suggested would be nice. Really I just wanted to say thank you for wanting to return kindness. People usually take kindness for granted when it’s shown.. guess that’s why it’s so rare
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So sorry for your loss.

It is kind and unselfish of you to express gratitude to others at a time when you are grieving.

I would give those who made the most difference cash (quietly), disguised in a card. They are grieving too and healthcare wages are so despicably low that some are living paycheck to paycheck, despite the fast that the corporations are vastly wealthy.

Gift cards have restrictions and come with added fees. Statistics show that many gift cards are never redeemed.
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I use to get staff a 5# box of See’s Candies to put in their break room. Under $100 last time I checked and always a big hit.

As well, I would take the time to write a heartfelt note on a nice card telling them how much their efforts meant to me and our family.
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