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Is there a way to get him on a better topic? This morning it's shoes, often it's BMs or something he dreamed overnight that he thinks really happened.

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Thanks so much. All good suggestions.
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You can turn the challenge to yourself by trying to think up a different answer for the same question asked repeatedly. That's not a sarcastic remark even it may sound like one. It's just a suggestion - you can't control your father's mind or what he says, you can only control your response, so perhaps you can challenge yourself to respond cleverly to the situation.

Or you can say something like, "I know, I agree, but I don't know what to do. Can I think about it for a while and let you know?"
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To be honest, it really depends on the circumstance. You can try distraction or just letting them talk like you haven't heard it before. That works short term. However, if you live with them for many years, it isn't that easy. You really couldn't spend your life doing it without it taking too great a toll on you.

Do you have help with your father, sooner, or is it just you. If it is just you and it is full-time long-term, it is okay to excuse yourself and walk away to your own space.
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Have you tried redirecting your dad? Think up some topics he might be interested in, maybe some things he was interested in before the Alzheimer's. When he starts obsessing try to bring him around to talking about something else. It's a lot of work and it takes a lot of energy and patience but it's worth a try. If this doesn't work then excuse yourself and go hide for a while. We can only take so much.
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Dear Sooner,

I know its hard to hear the same things over and over again. Or hear someone asking the same question on repeat. Its a tough situation. I would suggest asking the doctor or nurse and see if the medication might be contributing to this. Or try your best to let this go and like you said try going into another room to give yourself a break.
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Not really. Part of alzheimer's and other types of dementia and some mental illness is the obsessive conversations (also called ruminating) or fixation on subjects. Excusing yourself is sometimes the only way to get away.
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