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After my mother's stroke, I've been dealing with her medications. I know she's been taking every medicine that's been prescribed. When I go to pick up her medicines from the pharmacist, they would ask if we're ready to pick up various medicines and I wonder why because we have plenty of the meds in question. I don't know where or how it got screwed up, but now the pharmacist and the insurance company think my mom isn't complying. But know it's not the case. How do I straighten this out?

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Thank you all for your insight. I will put this to good use. I have a bit of good news that I discovered this morning. The app I use to track mom's meds, has been keeping a log dating back to when she got out of the hospital. So I feel better about being able to defend myself, and my mom. I do believe what freqflyer said, is what's happening. I know she's had changes in her meds. Churchmouse, that same thought crossed my mind about the monkey business. I hope that's not the case. That would be disheartening.
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It'll be a pain in the neck, a bigger or smaller pain depending on how far back the problem goes, but copy your mother's GP's pxs and give the insurance company sight of those. They can then compare them with submissions from the pharmacy. I hope it doesn't turn out that the pharmacy has been up to monkey business with its claims to the insurers, and it's just as suggested that a change in px hasn't filtered through, but even if they have it won't be your problem.
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Definitely check things as freqflyer suggests. My moms old dr was changing up her medications so often no one could keep track - dr said one thing, label said something else and the nh had something else recorded. It was a mess.
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It all depends on what the doctor had written on the prescription. Could be some meds it says take twice a day, but later down the line two a day is too much so the doctor cuts it back to once a day... but the prescription remains the same at the pharmacy until a new prescription is written.

Thus the pharmacy thinks it is time to reorder when in fact you already have enough of that medicine on hand.

What I would suggest is ask the doctor for all new prescriptions, and tell him/her what the situation is at the pharmacy.
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